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Showing posts from April 17, 2011

D-DAY FOR COSTA RICA PORT EXPANSION

Deadline day for Moín box terminal decisionShould the ruling on the legality of the award to APM Terminals go against the Costa Rican Government the state will be liable for a huge penalty..
Back in January.... In the next five years, the eastern port of Moín is expected to become on of the premier Caribbean ports throughout Central America. The first step in the expansion began in early January. Ronald Reyes | Tico Times Digging Deeper: A Dutch company has begun a $14 million dredging project at Moín port on the Caribbean coast. The project will allow bigger fuel tankers to enter the port, saving the government millions of dollars in transportation costs.


The first step in large-scale public works expansion project at Moín port on Costa Rica’s Caribbean coast began last week, as Dutch company Van Oord Dredging and Marine Contractors BV set about removing sediment to enlarge the port’s docking area. 
The dredging pr

WAL-MART TO OPEN 24 NEW STORES IN COSTA RICA

Wal-mart of Mexico and Central America announced Tuesday afternoon that it will open 24 new stores and create 839 new jobs in Costa Rica this year.
The vice president and general director the Mexico and Central America branch of Wal-Mart, Alberto Ebrard, announced the company plans a $160.5 million investment in Costa Rica.  The announcement was made during a meeting with President Laura Chinchilla.  Wal-Mart is the parent company of several Costa Rican grocery chains: Hipermás, Maxi Bodega, Max x Menos and Palí. 

FYFFES ON A PROFITABLE NOTE: PLEASED WITH ACQUISITIONS MODE

Source : Fresh Produce Journal (FreshInfo)Fyffes chairman eyes up further acquisitionsDavid McCann Fyffes achieved a slight rise in operating profit last year, with chairman David McCann hinting at further investments. The fruit importer recently acquired a one-third shareholding in German importer Fruchtimport vanWylick. The company achieved a small annual rise in adjusted pre-tax profit to €21.3 million during the course of the year, it revealed in its newly-published annual report for 2010. The company’s net profit for 2010 came in at €7.3m, a notable improvement on the previous two years, when it made a loss after tax of €9.9m (2009) and a small net gain of €380,000 (2008). “Having delivered a strong increase in [adjusted pre-tax] profits in 2009, the best since the ending of European banana import regulations in 2005, Fyffes was pleased to achieve a further increase in profits in 2010,” said McCann.

VIEWERS COMMENT : DAVID MARGULEAS (SUN WORLD) BAKERSFIELD, CALIFORNIA

Hi Will,
I've followed your IMO progress and admire your determination.
Sun World is no longer involved in the mango business.
Best of luck to you with IMO.
Regards, 
David
David Marguleas
David O. Marguleas
Chief Marketing Officer
David O. Marguleas is Chief Marketing Officer. 


He oversees global sales and marketing, business development, sourcing and licensing.


An officer of the Company since 1990, Marguleas has served in various marketing, merchandising and management roles. 







JULIE MANGO IN FLORIDA : NOT A GOOD COMBINATION

Plant Clinic
Julie mango is wilting
BY ADRIAN HUNSBERGER dade@ufl.edu
Q. We have a young Julie mango and this year it produced a bunch of flowers. 


But something caused the small branches to blackened and wilt. 


How should I treat it? M.G., Miami


A. Unfortunately, ‘Julie’ mangos often don't do well in Florida.
 They are very susceptible to the fungal disease called anthracnose. 
You will need to spray a fungicide such as copper or a fungicide with the active ingredient chlorothalonil.
Start spraying the fungicide as soon as the flower spike is a couple inches long.
Continue to spray until the fruit are about the size of a golf ball. 
Whichever fungicide you use, always follow label directions.

JOIN tacler MANGO DISCUSSION GROUP (tMDG) (M-F on tacler.com)

Join the IMO on the tMDG (tacler Mango Discussion Group)

Will Cavan will be up early(3am USA west coast / 11am Europe) to Moderate discussion.
Everyday (M-F) the mango industry joins in to exchange important Questions and answers regarding Global Mango Community.
IMO jumps on at 11am London Time everyday.
Many interesting topics to discuss and markets to analyze!
Register with tacler so you can sign in at:
www.tacler.com
Once you sign in go to mangoes to join discussion.

STUDY IN INDIA CHALLENGES TRADITIONAL POST HARVEST PRACTICES FOR RIPENING & PACKAGING

Packaging Material and Ripening Methods Affect Mango Fruit Quality
These studies were conducted on two major postharvest issues of local mango industry.  Firstly, more than 90% mangoes are packed in wooden crates, which are being eliminated in export markets.  Secondly, calcium carbide (CaC2) is mostly used for ripening of mango fruit; while, its use is being discouraged worldwide, due to associated health hazards.  To find out some better alternatives, two experiments were conducted on commercial mango cv. Samar Bahisht Chaunsa.  In both experiments, fruits were packed in traditional wood packaging with newspaper liner (WP) and corrugated cardboard packaging (CBP) for comparison.

NMB RESEARCH CONTINUES TO RECOMMEND HWT FOR MANGO ABOVE ALL OTHER ALTERNATIVES

IMO NOTE : The NMB bias to members who are invested in the HWT process which is fraught with defects is once again justified in this slanted research / position paper published by the NMB:
Alternative Treatments to Hot Water Immersion for Mango Fruit


With only a few exceptions, most mango fruit are grown in areas of the world where various fruit fly species are established.  For this reason, export of these mango fruit into the United States has required phytosanitary measures, usually a quarantine treatment, to assure no live fruit fly insects are present in imported fruit. The quality of mango fruit on the markets in the United States is too frequently of substandard quality.  While it is recognized that many factors can contribute to a loss in fruit quality; many in the mango industry feel that the hot water protocol is mainly responsible for the loss in mango fruit quality.

FOOD SAFETY : IMPORTANT LITERATURE

Antimocrobial Compounds Added in Edible Coatings for Use in Horticultural Products


Coatings and films are continuous matrixes typically formulated of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates or their combination.  A carbohydrate used to formulate edible coatings is the chitosan that reduces the growth of fungi and bacteria.  Coatings may work as vehicles of a broad range of food additives including antimicrobial compounds in order to provide higher attributes such as the control of microorganism.