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Showing posts from April 24, 2011

PHILIPPINES: FESTIVAL IN DAGUPAN CITY TO MAKE THE WORLDS LARGEST MANGO PIE

DAGUPAN CITY – A mango, bamboo, and bangus (milkfish) festival and two beauty contests will open on Monday in Pangasinan province. A Mango-Bamboo Festival will be formally opened with Vice President Jejomar Binay as guest of honor and speaker in San Carlos City. The celebration will start with a Thanksgiving Holy Mass in honor of the city’s patron saint Domingo de Guzman, to be followed by a grand parade.

THE TRAGEDY THAT IS ZIMBABWE

IMO NOTE: This story was first run a few weeks ago, and is continuing to get coverage on the international press. For our friends at SAMGA who knew Mr. Campbell personally, the IMO extends our heartfelt sympathies. This story is a tragedy on so many levels. If you have ever had the priveledge to visit Southern Africa, you will understand that the region is blessed to have been touched by his energy. A rare soul who puts his "heart" into a region

White African who fell victim to Mugabe's plundering thugs

Robyn Dixon

April 25, 2011






MICHAEL CAMPBELL
DISPOSSESSED FARMER
1932 - 6-4-2011


MIKE Campbell, the white Zimbabwean farmer who won a landmark case in southern Africa's highest court challenging the seizure of his farm by President Robert Mugabe's government, has died in Harare of complications from a savage beating by Mugabe loyalists in 2008.


He was 78.


Campbell, who called himself a white Zimbabwean, said: ''We're not British or Scottish or anything.…

FAO DATA TRACKS MANGO PLANTINGS & PRODUCTION AROUND THE WORLD

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California


April 24, 2011


Data Source: http://faostat.fao.org/site/567/DesktopDefault.aspx?PageID=567#ancor


The above referenced web site manged by the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, is a wealth of information.


Not as user friendly as the USDA data base, and perhaps more indicative of the information missing than the data provided. By this, the author intends that there is a telling abscence by some country members of actualization or participation in the process. This only strengthens and is further justification for the Global project of taking inventory of the world's mango trees.


From the data available, here are some interesting statistics:


This is a brief overview comparing the most current years available (2008 & 2009).


 The IMO will spend a country by country analysis and digest the complete inventory in the next few weeks.


The overview for 2009 is thus:


Consumption data…

THE DEBATE OVER THE ROLE OF ARAB AGRICULTURAL PRACTICES IN MANGO MIGRATION

The Arab Agricultural Revolution[1] (also known as the Medieval Green Revolution,[2][3]Muslim Agricultural Revolution, Islamic Agricultural Revolution[4] and Islamic Green Revolution)[5] is a term coined by the historian Andrew Watson in his influential 1974 paper postulating a fundamental transformation in agriculture from the 8th century to the 13th century in the Muslim lands.[1]  This was an extension of an earlier hypothesis of an agricultural revolution in Islamic Spain proposed much earlier in 1876 by the Spanish historian Antonia Garcia Maceira.[6] Watson argued that the economy established by Arab and other Muslim traders across the Old World enabled the diffusion of many crops and farming techniques among different parts of the Islamic world, as well as the adaptation of crops and techniques from and to regions beyond the Islamic world.  Crops from Africa such as sorghum, crops from China such as citrus fruits, and numerous crops from India such as mangos, rice, cotton and suga…

THE ORIGIN OF THE WORD "MANGO"

Source: Wikipedia
EtymologyThe English word "mango" probably originated from Malayalam manga via Portuguese (also manga).[2] The word's first recorded attestation in a European language was a text by Ludovico di Varthema in Italian in 1510, as manga; the first recorded occurrences in languages such as French and post-classical Latin appear to be translations from this Italian text.  The origin of the "-o" ending in English is unclear.[3] When mangoes were first imported to the American colonies in the 17th century, they had to be pickled due to lack of refrigeration.  Other fruits were also pickled and came to be called "mangoes" (especially bell peppers), and by the 18th century, the word "mango" became a verb meaning "to pickle".[4]
 In Oriya Mango is known as Aamba (ଆମ୍ବ).
References: ^Mango

U.K.: MORRISONS HALF WAY THROUGH 5 YEAR TRANSFORMATION PLAN

Source: Progressive Grocer
Morrisons, the UK’s 4th largest food retailer, is 2.5 years into a five-year business transformation project, one of the largest in the world that will change almost every area of the company and the technology it uses to run its business..
 With a forecast spend of approximately £310 million, the Evolve programme will significantly The Evolve program, in which the retailer invested $512 million, which includes a total review of people, process, systems and hardware, began in 2007 and will enable Morrisons to achieve its goal of being a supermarket fit for the future.
 Wipro Retail has been selected as the IT partner to deliver a new operating model to support the retailer’s strategic and commercial objectives.
 The model is being built using Oracle’s core application suite.

MANGO PRODUCTION IN PAKISTAN & INDIA

MANGO ON THE INDIAN SUB CONTINENT:





Mango in Pakistan





Mango in Southern India


MANGO PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION FACTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Source: WikipediaProduction and consumptionMangoes account for approximately half of all tropical fruits produced worldwide.  The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates worldwide production at nearly 35,000,000 tonnes (39,000,000 short tons) in 2009 .  The aggregate production of the top 10 countries is responsible for roughly 80% of worldwide production. AlphonsoBenishaan or Benisha (Banganapalli in Telugu and other south Indian languages) and Kesar mango varieties are considered among the best mangoes in India's southern states, while Dussehri andLangda varieties are most popular in the northern states. Generally, ripe mangoes have an orange-yellow or reddish peel and are juicy for eating, while exported fruit are often picked while underripe with green peels.  Although producing ethylene while ripening, unripened exported mangoes do not have the same juiciness or flavor as fresh fruit. Like other drupaceous fruits, mangoes come in both freestone and cling…

CULTURAL SIGNIFIGANCE OF THE MANGO AROUND THE WORLD

Source: WikipediaCultural significance Mango roundabout, Rajshahi, Bangladesh The mango is the national fruit of India,[36]Pakistan, and the Philippines.[37] The mango tree is the national tree of Bangladesh.[38] In Hinduism, the perfectly ripe mango is often held by Lord Ganesha as a symbol of attainment, regarding the devotees potential perfection.  Mango blossoms are also used in the worship of the goddess Saraswati. Mango leaves are used to decorate archways and doors in Indian houses and during weddings and celebrations like Ganesh Chaturthi.  Mango

FAO (DEC. 2010) GLOBAL CROP OUTLOOK (COUNTRIES THAT CAN NOT FEED THEMSELVES)

Source: http://www.fao.org/docrep/013/al972e/al972e00.pdf


Here is the latest crop forecast from the Food & Agriculture Organization (FAO) a part of the United Nations (UN)


Crop Prospects and Food Situation
Countries in crisis requiring external assistance for food





LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (2 countries)
Severe localized food insecurity 


Colombia
Severe flooding affected around 2 million people causing 
damage to housing, infrastructure, crops and livestock
+
Haiti
Food consumption improves, but levels of food insecurity 
remain higher than those prior to the earthquake 



GLOBAL MANGO STATISTICS FROM FAO

Top producers of mangoes, mangosteens, guavas, 2008-9CountryProduction in millions of tonsIndia
~ 13.6People's Republic of China
4.2Thailand
2.5

CARABAO OR CHAUNSA; PHILIPPINES CHALLENGE PAKISTAN FOR HONOR OF "SWEETEST" MANGO

In 1995, the Guinness Book of World records listed the Carabao Mango as the sweetest fruit in the world.
The carabao mango that made the Western Visayas  Island-province of Guimaras famous has created an  appetizing first-bite impression among Australians, the  Mango Information Network under the Philippine  Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources  Research and Development (PCARRD) reported.














HAITI MANGO INDUSTRY FIGHTS TO MAKE COMEBACK WITH USAID SUPPORT

Source: http://www.oreworld.org/mango.htm


Mangos represent the largest percentage of the tree population throughout Haiti. 


It was recently estimated by USAID that there are 10 million mango trees growing in Haiti. 


However, only about 10% of the existing trees are the Mme Francique commercial variety. 


The remainder are local varieties which have little commercial value. 


Population growth and increased economic pressures are leading to widespread deforestation throughout Haiti affecting low quality fruit trees which are cut down for fuel or wood products. 


Transforming low quality fruit trees by top-grafting is clearly a simple way of protecting the environment and improving the economic plight of the farmers by increasing their revenue.


 We see it as a choice between watching the majority of the trees disappearing over the next decade and trying to survive in an island without tree cover, or converting them to commercial trees. 


Only high revenue trees - such as commercial quality fruits a…

MANGO FROM HAITI: MADAME FRANCINE VARIETY

Above picture: Courtesy of Fairchild Tropical Botanical garden (FTBG)


Above picture: from Ore world.
This is the Couer d'or variety





Madame francine in Haiti

MANGO MIGRATION: Asia to Persia

Another Fabulous Fruit: Green MangoBy Revue Magazine • October 1, 2008 Green Mango Scholars believe Buddhist monks took mangoes on voyages from Asia to Persia in the Fourth and Fifth centuries B.C., and that the Persians subsequently took them to Africa in the 10th century.
 From there the Portuguese introduced them to Brazil during its 16th century colonization of the New World.
 And from Brazil the mango spread to Central America. 
Although there are strains of mango that are green when fully ripe — including the cambodiana, saigon, cecil and jacquelin — the green mango sold in the Guatemalan markets is a normal mango picked before ripeness. 
At this stage it has an extremely tart taste and less fibrous texture than a mature specimen. 
Interestingly, of all the mangoes made available for import, nearly 80 percent go to England and France.

A BLUSH LIKE NO OTHER: TOMMY ATKINS MANGO

Famous for its red purple blush, Tommy Atkins was heavily promoted by the mango importers back in the 80s, 90s and today is the primary variety in USA market. The fruit is about as close to an "apple" both in sizing and color for a non-mango end user. This approach has back-fired in the market place, as the Tommy does not eat well when subjected to Hot water Treatment.