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THE INTERNATIONAL MANGO SYMPOSIUM SERIES: ( VI ) THAILAND (1999)

IMO NOTE: One of the most important events in the Global mango Community is the International mango Symposium series. These events are driven by the Scientific community and highlight the latest research dealing with production side issues. Here is an extract from the VIth symposium held in Thailand in 1999.


Reproduced from: J. Appl. Hort., 1(2):149-150, July-December, 1999


A Report on the Sixth International Mango Symposium


Dr Suranant Subhadrabandhu
Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand



Participating countries | Field trip | Technical sessions | Presentations | Topics not much discussed |
Seventh International Mango Symposium | Home | Mangoes

Introduction:


The Sixth International Mango Symposium was held at the Merlin Hotel in Pattaya City, Thailand from April 6-9, 1999.


 The symposium was organized by the Horticultural Science Society of Thailand with the strong support from the Department of Horticulture at Kasetsart University; t…

CONTROL & CONTAINMENT OF OIDIUM (MANGO'S MORTAL ENEMY)

As with most pathogens of plants, there are three main methods of preventing or controlling infection of mango by powdery mildew: exclusion, evasion, and eradication. ]ExclusionThe conditions conducive to the growth of powdery mildew on mango are consistent enough that predictions can be made as to when to apply fungicides to protect the crop.  These predictions are based mainly on mean daily temperature and rainfall, and have been used to create a simple program that indicates when spraying is necessary.  The most commonly used means of control of Oidium mangiferae is the use of sulfur and copper fungicides, particularly copper sulfate and elemental sulfur.[12] Bordeaux mixture, when applied prior to flowering, has also been shown to have a preventative effect.[16] Sulfur fungicides are applied by dusting onto the plant, with an application rate of 1-3 lbs of fungicide per tree. The sulfur is applied shortly after flowering, followed by two more applications at 15 day intervals.[2] Fungic…

WHAT OIDIUM LOOKS LIKE ON A MANGO BLOOM & LEAF

THE IMPORTANCE OF WEATHER MONITORING AT BLOOM AND ITS EFFECT ON MANGO PRODUCTION

O. mangiferae appears in spring, from December through March, and primary inoculum comes either from wind borne conidia from other infection sites, or from surviving inoculum and mycelia on the tree.[11] Powdery mildew is most prevalent in cool, dry years, and secondary infections also occur from wind dispersed conidia.[12][7]  The disease is highly polycyclic, with the pathogen life cycle from germination to conidiation taking only 9 days, and conidia infecting the plant tissues 5-7 hours after germination.[13]  Warm temperatures with cloud cover and heavy dew promote infection, though dry conditions favor disease development.[14][2] The fungus overwinters in infected leaves and malformed inflorescences in the form of dormant mycelium, conidiophores or conidia.[14] This fungus is ectophytic, existing primarily on the surface of plant tissues. It draws nutrients from the plant via haustoria that penetrate the epidermal layer.[2] This pathogen is also biotrophic, surviving only on live plan…

OIDIUM: MANGO'S MORTAL ENEMY

Oidium mangiferae is a plant pathogen that infects mango trees causing powdery mildew.[1]


Powdery mildew of mango is an Ascomycete pathogen of the Erysiphales family that was initially described by Berthet in 1914, using samples collected from Brazil.[2]


O. mangiferae is found in all areas where mangoes have been raised long term, but is particularly widespread in India where both the host and the pathogen are native.


 Currently no teleomorph stage has been identified, but due to certain morphological characteristics it has been suggested that O. mangiferae belongs in the Erysiphe polygony group. 


Mango is the only known host for this pathogen, though O. mangiferae appears to be identical to fungi responsible for powdery mildew diseases on various other plant species, particularly oak, though some differences may be observed. 


In particular, the number of cells in conidiophores varies from 2 on mango to 3-5 on oak. 


O. mangiferae has been known to infect oak leaves in the laboratory, howeve…

IS WILL CAVAN A BLOGGER OR A JOURNALIST?

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California






April 25, 2011









In an attempt to give the viewer a little background about the source of some of the articles that are published on the IMO BLOG, I have put finger to key board (or pen to paper in the pre type writer or computer day).






The author has published many a paper in his day.





 Going all the way back to High school, i could have never imagined the impact my journalism class in Senior year woul have on my life.





It all started with my first column for the newspaper at the Carol Morgan School "rag" in the Dominican Republic (1976), The Menlo College  "Oak" Newspaper (1979), and many a college thesis as a Latin American History major with a double minor in Political Science and Economics at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).




Living in La Jolla, California, I had the priveledge of knowing Niel Morgan, Editor of the San Diego Union tribune Newspaper, 




He and his charming wi…

WHAT IS A BLOGGER? (AND DOES THAT MAKE YOU A JOURNALIST?)

Are Bloggers Journalists?by JEREMY PORTER on APRIL 6, 2010

PRWeekandPRNewswire recently teamed up on a study that found 52% of bloggers consider themselves journalists.  The last time they did this study, roughly a third of bloggers felt this way.  Why do more bloggers consider themselves journalists these days?  Well for starters, it’s cool to be a journalist.  That’s not the result of the study, that’s just my guess. Regardless of your position on the topic, it’s clear that bloggers are gaining more and more influence.  Audience size is growing for many, and collectively bloggers have a reach equal to or greater than traditional media across many categories.  Bloggers and traditional outlets are both equipped with the ability to rapidly spread information across the Web at the same pace.

NYT: THE VERSATILE MANGO (YUMMY TACOS!)

RECIPES FOR HEALTHShrimp and Mango TacosAndrew Scrivani for The New York Times By MARTHA ROSE SHULMANPublished: April 25, 2011 This sweet and pungent combination of mango, shrimp, chiles and cumin is as quick to put together as a stir-fry. 
Indeed, if you don’t have corn tortillas on hand, serve the shrimp with rice. Recipes for HealthMartha Rose Shulman presents food that is vibrant and light, full of nutrients but by no means ascetic, fun to cook and to eat. See All Recipes for Health »Visit Recipes for Health on Facebook. RelatedRecipes for Health: The ‘King of Fruits’ Commands Respect (April 25, 2011)Recipes for Health: Pigeon Peas With Mango (April 26, 2011)

OH!... FOR THE LOVE OF MANGOES!

From the Daily News & Analysis (DNA) India



A madness for mangoesAmi Gandhi | Tuesday, April 26, 2011  Comments  |  Post a comment  |   Share this article  |   Print  |   Email A few days ago, when I returned home from work, the first thing that came to my notice was the tangy fragrance.  While untying my shoelaces, I kept breathing in deeply to pick up the aroma.  Later, while heading to the kitchen to check on what mom was cooking, I could see the plump, juicy, sweet and obviously tangy king of fruits: the mango, back in my house after a year. Who will not be fascinated with its shape, colour and fragrance?  Who will not love to grab one from the red box full of Alphonso mangoes?  But alas, before I could do so, my mother instructed me to wait for a couple of days — the mangoes had not yet fully ripened. Mangoes and memories go hand in hand.

INDIA: THE MANGO FAMILY TREE (NOT ALL MANGOES ARE SWEET)

From Deccan Herald (INDIA)

Of mango-scented Malnad air...Sandhya Hegde Almane
The aroma of the appemidi hangs heavy in the Malnad air, come summer. This mango variety has a history of centuries.
Sode king Sadashiva Raya makes a mention of the appemidi in his 17th century-work.

The Gazetteer of 1884 also makes note of this variety.

Folk tradition is replete with anecdotes and literature revolving around the mango.

In fact, there are many villages named after the fruit.


 Mavinakoppa, Mavinakurve, Mavinajaddi and Mavinahole are some examples.

The appemidi in the Malnad region  has  two varieties, one that turns sweet when it ripens (jeerigemidi) and the other that continues to be sour even when ripe (appemidi).

Decades ago, pickle making was not a hugely commercial exercise.

NYT: WHY DON'T AMERICANS EAT MORE MANGOS?

RECIPES FOR HEALTHThe ‘King of Fruits’ Commands RespectAndrew Scrivani for The New York Times By MARTHA ROSE SHULMANPublished: April 25, 201 Why don’t Americans eat more mangoes? 
Often called the “king of fruits” elsewhere in the world, the mango is not high in calories, and it is an excellent source of beta-carotene, vitamin A and potassium.
 Now is the time to get acquainted with them: although they’re in season from January to August, mangoes peak in May and June. Recipes for HealthMartha Rose Shulman presents food that is vibrant and light, full of nutrients but by no means ascetic, fun to cook and to eat. See All Recipes for Health »Visit Recipes for Health on Facebook. RelatedRecipes for Health: Pigeon Peas With Mango (April 26, 2011)<