Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from July 3, 2011

FIERCE RIVALRY DEVELOPES IN LIEU OF CHAVEZ PRESENCE IN VENEZUELA AMONG HIS "FAITHFUL"....

July 3, 2011 10:01 pm

Chávez’s health raises power vacuum fears





The gruelling siege dragging on at El Rodeo prison outside Caracas, where a few dozen heavily armed inmates are still holding out against national guards after almost three weeks, may for now have been eclipsed by the startling news that Venezuela’s president has cancer.
But as Venezuelans gradually come to terms with the fact that Hugo Chávez could remain in Cuba for as long as six months, after emergency surgery there last month on a cancerous tumour, they are beginning to ask how the Opec country’s highly personalised government will operate in the interim.

“[Mr] Chávez is the man in charge around here,” says Yoana Castillo, the wife of one of the inmates being held hostage inside El Rodeo, who doesn’t even know if her husband is still alive. “Where is [Mr] Chávez when you need him?” she asks angrily, metres away from a human wall of national guards in riot gear outside the prison.

With dozens now dead, the crisis playing …

CORRUPTION AND INEFFICIENCY BLAMED ON PAKISTAN GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AS GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY TO WIN OVER USA CONSUMERS SLIPS AWAY...

Historic opportunity of mango export to USA in danger




Pakistani mangos are attracting world liking including USA. 
It was some months ago, when US foreign secretary Hillary Clinton visited Pakistan where in Islamabad she was served with delicious mangos.
She was so impressed after eating the mangos that she could not help saying that she never ever had such a marvelous taste in mangos anywhere in the world. She went on praising Pakistan summer fruit and expressed her deep desire that her people may also enjoy the taste.

It clearly means if we can export them to USA according to International processing standards, we can earn millions of dollars besides goodwill for other Pakistani fruits also. This can multiply export orders from USA and the foreign reserve as well.

Unfortunately, no license of Pakistani mangos could be acquired in USA since our independence. When Secretary Clinton hailed our fruits, her remarks ignited a want in US market to bring mangos from Pakistan. A vigilant Pakist…

ENJOY THE HOLIDAY: 18 SCENIC HIGHWAYS AROUND THE WORLD...

The World's 18 Strangest Roadways: Gallery
The most direct path between two points is a straight line, but roads are rarely straight, and the ones that are can be terminally boring. 
Engineers around the world must calculate the most efficient routes over massive mountains, through densely populated cities and around unavoidable bodies of water, all while accounting for the ecological and financial cost of such projects. 
The results can be astonishing. 
Here are some of the world's most notable roads and why they stand out.


BY CHRIS SWEENEY

Read more: The World's 18 Strangest Roadways: Gallery - Popular Mechanics

SOUTH KOREA GIVES "GREEN LIGHT" TO FREE TRADE AGREEMENT WITH PERU....

S.Korean parliament ratifies FTA pact with Peru


Xinhua
Updated: 2011-06-29 22:05:00





SEOUL, June 29 (Xinhua) -- South Korea's National Assembly on Wednesday ratified the free trade agreement (FTA) with Peru, paving the way for further economic cooperation between the two nations.

The ratification came after the National Assembly foreign affairs and trade committee approved it on Tuesday.

The two nations launched their talks about an FTA bill in March 2008, and entered official negotiations in early 2009. The trade deal was formally signed in March this year.

South Korea's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade hailed the approvement of the deal in a statement, saying it will contribute to promoting trades and investments and strengthening cooperation in resources development.

The deal, the second of its kind South Korea reached with a Latin American country, following the FTA with Chile signed in 2003, calls for the abolishment of all tariffs in trade within 10 years.

Under the pact, …

RESOUNDING VICTORY IN ELECTIONS SENDS THAI CURRENCY UP....

Thailand’s Baht Rises as Pro-Thaksin Party Wins
By Anuchit Nguyen and Yumi Teso - Jul 3, 2011 6:43 PM PT







Pheu Thai party supporters celebrate victory of Thailand's political elections at Pheu Thai headquarters in Bangkok. Photographer: Dario Pignatelli/Bloomberg


July 4 (Bloomberg) -- Richard Yetsenga, head of global foreign-exchange strategy at Australia & New Zealand Banking Group Ltd., talks about Thailand's election and its implications for the local currency. Yetsenga also talks about the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand dollars. He speaks with John Dawson on Bloomberg Television's "First Up." (Source: Bloomberg)



July 4 (Bloomberg) -- Michael Montesano, a visiting research fellow at the Institute of Southeast Asia Studies in Singapore, talks about Thailand's political future following the weekend elections. The party linked to exiled Thai leader Thaksin Shinawatra won a parliamentary majority, making it more difficult for his opponents to overturn the res…

INDEPENDENCE???USA HAD MORE FREEDOM 235 YEARS AGO THAN TODAY....

"By today's standards, King George III was a very mild tyrant indeed.
 He taxed his American colonists at a rate of only pennies per annum. 
His actual impact on their personal lives was trivial. He had arbitrary power over them in law and in principle, but in fact it was seldom exercised. 
If you compare his rule with that of today's U.S. Government, you have to wonder why we celebrate our independence." - Joe Sobran

CON CHAVEZ EN LA "CUERDA FLOJA"....NICARAGUA SALE BUSCAR NUEVOS AMIGOS....

Nicaragua: Ortega saluda a EEUU por Independencia                                                                                                                                                                                      AP – Hace 2 horas 17 minutos




MANAGUA (AP) — El presidente Daniel Ortega saludó el domingo al gobierno y pueblo de los Estados Unidos por la celebración del 235mo aniversario de la Declaración de Independencia el 4 de julio.

"Reiteramos nuestra voluntad y compromiso de propiciar y fortalecer el respeto y cooperación entre nuestros gobiernos y pueblos. Recordamos que los pueblos de América Latina y el Caribe también debemos vivir según las normas de la Justicia, la Libertad y la Paz", dice Ortega en una carta que publica el sitio electrónico del gobierno El 19.

"Compartimos plenamente los conceptos que llevaron a los Padres Fundadores de los Estados Unidos a romper con la Corona Británica, a liberarse de la condición de Colonia, y a luchar hasta al…

DE AQUI EN ADELANTE...TENDRA CHAVEZ....RELEVANCIA...EN EL FUTURO DE LATINO AMERICA ???

Avance | Análisis | 02/07/2011 09:13:32 a.m.

¿Y ahora qué?


Chávez admitió que se le halló un tumor maligno y que debe atender un estricto régimen médico para su recuperación. Tal situación configura un nuevo escenario con implicaciones políticas en dos ámbitos directos: la gobernabilidad inmediata del país y el futuro de la campaña presidencial de 2012


Por: Alejandro Botía










El anuncio hecho el jueves en la noche por el presidente Hugo Chávez sobre su estado de salud, si bien confirmó finalmente los rumores que durante las últimas semanas alertaban acerca de un cáncer que afecta al mandatario nacional, no despeja del todo las interrogantes respecto al panorama político nacional en el futuro inmediato.

La gran pregunta que más de uno se hace es ¿y ahora qué? Chávez admitió en cadena nacional desde Cuba que se le encontró un tumor maligno, que ha sido operado dos veces; que está siendo objeto de drenajes para limpiar completamente la zona afectada y que atiende un estricto régimen médico para…

MEMORABLE PROFESSORS & THEIR LASTING INFLUENCE ON OUR LIVES: DR. TORE TJERSLAND

Tore Tjersland died of brain cancer at the age

of 76 on August 8, 2003. 

As a teenager, Dr.Tjersland was part of the 
Norwegian resistance to the German occupation during World War II.

While attempting to cut off a supply route by

blowing up a bridge with dynamite, Tjersland

was captured by German troops and spent two

years in a concentration camp. 

After immigrating to the United States, Dr. 
Tjersland earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering 
at Colorado School of Mines. 

He went on to study

corporate finance at Syracuse University,

receiving a master’s of business administration.


In the early 1960s, well into his career as a

college educator, he received a doctorate in

economics as a Sloan Fellow at Stanford

University. 

Tjersland moved to San Diego in the

1960s. 

He taught courses in economics and

operations research at California Western

University. 

In 1975, Dr. Tjersland became

chairman of the Department of Economics and

Management Science at National University. 

He later lectured in t…

A WONDERFUL HISTORIAN PASSES THE SCENE...UCSD PROFESSOR RAMON RUIZ WAS AN INFLUENCE ON WILL CAVAN....

Historian Ramón Eduardo Ruiz, 88

National Humanities Medal Winner Was the Author of 15 Books on Mexican and Latin American History

July 22, 2010


Ramón Eduardo Ruiz – professor emeritus of history at UC San Diego and a winner of the National Humanities Medal – died in his Rancho Santa Fe home on July 6. He was 88. 

Honored by President Bill Clinton as “one of America’s premier and pioneering scholars of Latin American history,” Ruiz died after complications from a recent fall and a battle with cancer.

Ruiz, who taught at UCSD for more than two decades, was the author of 15 books, including landmark works on the Mexican and Cuban revolutions.

Born September 9, 1921, Ruiz was a native San Diegan and grew up in La Jolla, where his interest in Mexico was nurtured by his family. “My father was a militant nationalist,” Ruiz said in a 1998 interview with The Los Angeles Times. “He would talk about the heroes of Mexico, the food of Mexico, the character of Mexico and the folklore of Mexico. We wer…

WORLD BANK WILLING TO SHARE DATABASE WITH THE WORLD....FOR A FEE....

World Bank Is Opening Its Treasure Chest of Data



Marc Phares/Epic Studios

By STEPHANIE STROM
Published: July 2, 2011


WASHINGTON


Philip Scott Andrews/The New York Times

The World Bank's Washington building.


THE Piper PA-31 Navajo took off into the sultry Miami morning and streaked southward toward the Caribbean. High over Haiti, the cameras inside began to snap.

Behind this reconnaissance mission was, of all things, a financial institution: the World Bank, symbol of globalization and, to many, the hubris of wealthy nations.

But this was hardly some clandestine operation. 
On the contrary, the aerial photographs taken that January morning in 2010, shortly after a powerful earthquake leveled much of Port-au-Prince, were soon uploaded to the Web for all to see, along with an invitation to help World Bank specialists assess the damage and figure out how to aid Haiti.

The appeal marked a radical departure for the often close-to-the-vest World Bank, which, like its brother, the International Moneta…