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THE EL NIñO / LA NIñA CYCLE HAS BEEN AROUND FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS AND IS BEING STUDIED IN AFRICA...

La Ninas distant effects in East Africa

by Staff Writers
Potsdam, Germany (SPX) Aug 05, 2011


GFZ-Scientists analyse sediments in the Challa-Lake, a crater lake at the Kilimandjaro.



For 20 000 years, climate variability in East Africa has been following a pattern that is evidently a remote effect of the ENSO phenomenon (El Nino Southern Oscillation) known as El Nino/La Nina. During the cold phase of La Nina, there is marginal rainfall and stronger winds in East Africa, while the El Nino warm phase leads to weak wind conditions with frequent rain.


Moreover, during the coldest period of the last ice age about 18 000 to 21 000 years ago, East Africa's climate was relatively stable and dry. This result was published by an international group of researchers from Potsdam, Switzerland, the United States, the Netherlands and Belgium in the latest issue of the journal "Science" (Vol. 333, No.6043, 05.08.2011).

ENSO with its warm phase (El Nino) and its cold phase (La Nina) is actually…

EMILY DOWNGRADED AS STORM STALLS OVER HAITI...STILL A THREAT OF FLASH FLOODING...

Emily breaks up over Haiti, still threatens rains







By Joseph Guyler Delva

PORT-AU-PRINCE | Thu Aug 4, 2011 8:35pm EDT

(Reuters) - Tropical Storm Emily broke apart over the mountains of Haiti and the Dominican Republic on Thursday but its remnants still packed rains threatening flash floods and mudslides in the neighboring Caribbean countries.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the storm dissipated into a low pressure trough, but cautioned it still had potential to regenerate.

That meant Florida's authorities would be watching the weather system to ensure it did not restrengthen into a threat to the state's eastern coast.

The remnants of Emily were stretched out across Hispaniola, the island shared by Haiti and the Dominican Republic and over the Turks and Caicos, at 8 p.m. EDT, the Miami-based center said. Emily had been the fifth named storm of the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season,

The governments of the Dominican Republic, Cuba and the Bahamas all dropped tropical storm watches a…

MAJOR HURRICANE FORMS OFF OF PACIFIC COAST...FAR FROM LAND...BUT AFFECTING SHIPPING LANES...

Eugene becomes a 'major hurricane' off Baja California



As the hurricane produces sustained winds of 115 mph, but little threat to land, forecasters are keeping a close eye on Tropical Storm Emily, which is expected to hit the Caribbean on Wednesday.



National Weather Service tracking shows Hurricane Eugene in the open Pacific, about 580 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California on Tuesday night. (National Weather Service National Hurricane Center / August 2, 2011)







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By Megan GarveyLos Angeles Times Staff Writer

August 2, 2011, 10:22 p.m.




Hurricane Eugene, which is moving across the open Pacific off the coast of Baja California, has reached "major hurricane" status, according to an advisory issued late Tuesday by the National Weather Service.


The storm is producing sustained winds of 115 mph but remains far from land and has generated no warnings or watches for coastal areas. Weather officials report that the hurricane will "remain no …

TROPICAL STORMS EXPECTED TO PICK UP INTENSITY BETWEEN NOW & NOVEMBER...BRACE FOR ANOTHER DOZEN BY THE END OF SEASON...

Forecasters predict unusually active hurricane season

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is expecting seven to 10 hurricanes, with three to five carrying winds upward of 111 mph.


Two people ride in a motorcycle covered by an umbrella in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic August 4, 2011 after the heavy rains that came with the tropical storm Emily. (Orlando Barra / EPA)




ALSO
Haitians anxious as Tropical Storm Emily nears
Graphic: Tropical storm Emily pounds Caribbean
Eugene becomes a 'major hurricane' off Baja California

Graphic: Ocean temperature data


By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times

August 5, 2011



Exceptionally warm ocean waters and favorable atmospheric conditions are expected to bring an above-average number of tropical storms and hurricanes to the Atlantic and Caribbean, national weather forecasters predicted Thursday.


The forecast comes as Florida braces for the remnants of Tropical Storm Emily, which has pounded the Caribbean in recent days with rain and wind…

COLORFIELD FARMS MANGO FESTIVAL DRAWS RECORD CROWDS...PROVING WHY A FRESH MANGO TROUNCES A HWT MANGO ANY DAY !!

Mango festival draws record turnout

MANGO FESTIVAL IN NMB'S BACKYARD SHOWS WHY HWT MANGOES DO NOT SELL...




LOIS KINDLE/STAFF


Cherri Clark, center, looks over boxes of tree-ripened mangos at Colorfield Farms during its recent Mango Festival. The three-day event attracted more than 1,000 people.



By LOIS KINDLE | The Tampa Tribune
Published: August 03, 2011
Updated: August 03, 2011 - 2:50 PM

WIMAUMA --

More than 1,000 visitors from all over the Tampa Bay area learned there is nothing like a tree-ripened mango at the recent Colorfield Farms Mango Festival.

Hosted by owner Ann Pidgeon, the three-day event showcased the tropical fruit through continuous samplings, educational demos, smoothie sales and a farmers market filled with many of the 35 varieties of mango she grows at her plant nursery.

"It's small, but it's still a lot of fun," said Leanna Romero of Brandon, as she purchased a Keitt mango tree. "This is my second visit. I've introduced many of my fri…

ANATOMY OF WHY THINGS DON'T WORK IN ZIMBABWE: ONCE VERDANT FARMS LAID TO WASTE BY AN INEPT GOVERNMENT

Published by the government of Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe: Guruve Citrus Deal Goes Sour

Opitato Guvamombe

4 August 2011




Bindura — Before land reform, it was common to see a refrigerated haulage truck, nod, hobble, huff and puff past the communal land carrying export fresh fruit.

Villagers knew the content but never had the chance to taste their succulence as the white farmer only allowed them access to the rotten and low-grade citrus.

Year after year, villagers watched in disbelief, as white commercial farmers exported high-grade mango, orange and other fruits and wondered how special those forcing consumers were.


"There goes the white man's fruits! There goes the special fruit . . . There goes murungu's special fruit. Murungu . . . murungu . . . murungu," sang the children each time the trucks made a beeline.

On the advent of the land reform programme, the vast expanses of orange and mango plantations became the mainstay of Guruve district, having been taken over by the loca…

BRAZIL'S AMAZON RAIN FOREST...HOME TO FUNGUS THAT CAN BREAK DOWN PLASTIC...RAIN FORESTS ARE MANKIND'S LAST LINE OF DEFENSE...

Yale researchers find fungus that can break down plastic (video)

Published: Tuesday, August 02, 2011




By ED STANNARD
New Haven Register






NEW HAVEN — There’s a course at Yale University in which undergraduates travel to the Amazon rain forest to collect fungi.




The fungus samples are often nothing you’ve encountered. 

One of them, however, which will be featured in a paper accepted by a scientific journal, might solve the problem of polyurethane building up in our landfills. 

The fungus basically eats the plastic and breaks it down into carbon.


That’s just one discovery being studied in the Rainforest Expedition and Laboratory course taught by professor Scott A. Strobel.



“We take 15 undergraduates into the Ecuadorean rain forest and collect plant samples,” said Kaury Kucera, co-instructor of the course and a postdoctoral researcher in the department of molecular biophysics and biochemistry.



The fungus they’re looking for “grows in the inner tissues of plant samples that is symbiotic with the plant …

LA GENETICA TIENE LA ULTIMA PALABRA...O COMO LLEGAR A LOS 100 AñOS...

Para vivir 100 años: más suerte que vida sana



Ilustración SEMANA.



SALUD
Un estudio con 500 personas de 95 años o más encontró que su longevidad se debe más a su genética que a haber llevado una vida sana y virtuosa.



Jueves 4 Agosto 2011



Durante mucho tiempo se ha debatido si para vivir una vida larga influyen más los genes o el estilo de vida. Los estudios hasta ahora sugerían que ambos son igualmente importantes.

Sin embargo, una nueva investigación llevada a cabo con cerca de 500 centenarios encontró que la respuesta para una vida larga parece estar en los genes.



El estudio comparó el estilo de vida de 477 personas, todos judíos asquenazí, de entre 95 y 112 años con el de otros 3.000 individuos de la población general nacidos durante la misma época.



Los resultados mostraron que aquéllos que han logrado una vida excepcionalmente larga comían tan mal, hacían tan poco ejercicio, consumían tanto alcohol y tabaco y tenían tanto sobrepeso como aquéllos que se habían muerto hacía mucho tiempo.



L…

STILL ANOTHER STUDY PROVES THE BENEFITS TO REMOVING NITROGEN LEVELS FROM THE ENVIRONMENT...

New study outlines economic and environmental benefits to reducing nitrogen pollution
by Staff Writers
New, York, NY (SPX) Aug 01, 2011


illustration only





A new study co-authored by Columbia Engineering professor Kartik Chandran and recently published in the journal, Environmental Science and Technology, shows that reducing nitrogen pollution generated by wastewater treatment plants can come with "sizable" economic benefits, as well as the expected benefits for the environment.






Chandran was one of five scientists from around the U.S. who worked on the study, along with James Wang of NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory and formerly of Environmental Defense Fund (EDF); Steve Hamburg, Chief Scientist for EDF; Donald Pryor of Brown University; and Glen Daigger of CH2M Hill, a global environmental engineering firm based in Englewood, Colorado.




The study found that adding available technology to the existing infrastructure at a common type of wastewater treatment plant could create a tri…

NASA SPACE IMAGERY SHOW HOW BIG A STORM CAN BE...THIS ONE...MUIFA...FORTUNATELY IS OUT AT SEA IN THE NORTHWEST PACIFIC...

Tropical Storm Muifa appears huge on NASA infrared imagery
by Staff Writers
Greenbelt MD (SPX) Aug 01, 2011


NASA's Aqua satellite passed over huge Tropical Storm Muifa on July 29, 2011 at 04:17 UTC (12:17 a.m. EDT. The infrared image revealed a large area of powerful, high thunderstorms with cold cloud tops (purple) east and west of the center where cloud temperatures were colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius). Muifa is about 1000 miles wide. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen.




The width of an image from the AIRS instrument that flies on NASA's Aqua satellite is about 1700 km (1056 miles), and the clouds and thunderstorms associate with Tropical Storm Muifa take up that entire distance in the latest imagery.

Tropical Storm Muifa is spinning through the western North Pacific Ocean Friday and has grown in size. When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm on July 29, 2011 at 04:17 UTC (12:17 a.m. EDT) it measured the temperatures in the cloud tops. Those cloud top temperatures …