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"ANY BUSINESS THAT ADDS UP TO LESS THAN THE SUM OF IT'S PARTS IS DOOMED TO FAIL"...NEW BOOK TELL YOU WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR...

How to Tell if Your Company Sucks

By Ned Smith, 

BusinessNewsDaily Senior Writer

04 AUG2011



You'll know that your company sucks when you wake up one morning and realize that the thrill has gone out of the business for you, for your employees and for your customers, said Mark Stevens, head of the marketing firm MSCO. 

The antidote is to declare war on yourself.                                                                                                                    

He should know. It happened to him.

"I learned it a very painful way," said Stevens, who has authored 26 books on business, including the classic "Your Marketing Sucks" (Crown Business, 2005). "I thought we were really great."

Up close and personal

His company wasn't failing, but it was foundering and at risk of becoming less than the sum of its parts, one of Steven's metrics for business success. He resolved that he would never let his company suck again and took the steps…

THE PAKISTANI ARRIVAL OF MANGOES TO THE USA HOLD OUT HOPE FOR MORE GOOD THINGS TO COME...

Amidst strained relations, mangoes quench a thirst


Arsalan MalikSaturday, August 06, 2011






WASHINGTON: The arrival of Pakistani mangoes in the US and distribution of beautiful packets to those who matter by the Pakistan Embassy, is the culmination of a multiyear effort led by dozens of individuals in various capacities in both Pakistan and the US. The group charged with leading the effort in Pakistan is the National Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (NAPHIS), a child aged subgroup of the now dissolved Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MINFA).

NAPHIS, which was designed in 2006 to be a counterpart of the USDA’s APHIS programme, was and is still led by Malik Zahoor Ahmad as its Director General. Mr Ahmad, a former high ranking diplomat, who served two terms in Washington, found himself in familiar territory with the mango project and the larger NAPHIS initiative, as he dealt with former colleagues from his embassy days. 

In fact, several notable members at the US State Department, i…

MANGOES FROM EGYPT ARE AVAILABLE NOW...

For more information....


http://www.egyptoverseas.com/rrr.html



AS BRAZIL MANGO SEASON BEGINS...EXPORTERS FACE AN UNFRIENDLY ECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT: NO INTEREST IN DOLLARS...

Brazil's U.S. dollar inflows reach record

by Staff Writers
Rio De Janeiro (UPI) Aug 4, 2011


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only


Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is busy dealing with a problem many emerging market leaders would love to have: billions of dollars of unwanted foreign investment flowing into the country, drawn to its interest rates and a strong currency.

By last count net inflows of the U.S. dollar in July reached $15.83 billion while net outflows remained minor by comparison.

The strong currency and the relatively attractive interest rates are proving a magnet for speculative investors with money to stake on profits from attractive margins on the interest rates and the psychological attraction of a strong real, the Brazilian national currency.

Central Bank figures indicated investment inflows of $9.57 billion and trade-related dollar inflows of $6.25 billion during July.

In contrast, net outflows in June totaled $2.56 billion in June, the last figure a…

THE INCONSISTANCIES OF THE GLOBAL DEBT CRISIS...WHY SOME COUNTRIES FARE BETTER THAN OTHERS...

Untangling paradoxes in the debtcrisis
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) Aug 5, 2011





For the average observer, the unfolding world economic crisis offers some bewildering paradoxes: untangling them however, helps give a clearer picture of the true state of play.

The eurozone may be in crisis but the euro remains strong.

Ratings agencies, say the critics, are punishing some countries but sparing others whose economies are equally weak.

And never the mind that Japan has the biggest debt burden among industrialised nations as a proportion of Gross Domestic Product --investors are still backing the yen.

First the euro, which is still strong against the dollar even as Greece is on the brink of a debt default despite a second international bail-out.

Italy and Spain meanwhile are being forced to borrow at unprecedented rates on the markets, threatening to force the eurozone's third- and fourth-largest economies into a debt bailout.

The reason the euro remains strong is that the dollar has nev…

EGYPTIAN GENETIC PROFILE COMPARE TWO LOCAL MANGO CULTIVARS..."HANIA" versus "AML"...

Abstract: Selection of some strains is considered the first step in improving mango production. So, this study was done for a three successive seasons (2003 – 2005) on two Egyptian mango strains "Hania" and "Aml" to describe them, horticulturally and identification those genetically utilizing DNA fingerprint. 


The vegetative characters (leaf shape, length, width, etc) and histological characteristics (number of stomata per mm (stomatal density), stomata length and width) showed great variation between the two studied strains. 


The fruit weight was 581 gm for Hania strain and 1020 gm for Aml strain. The two strains fruits had good characters as shape, net weight ratio, firmness, SSC, TA, Vit. C and total sugars.


 In generally, physical and chemical properties of Aml strain fruits were better than Hania strain. 


These differences of horticultural aspects due to genetic variances, which were determined by using SSR markers, of the 42 primers screened, 36 primers gave rep…

LEAKING OIL INDUSTRY INFRASTRUCTURE ON LAKE MARACAIBO...THREATENS BLUE CRAB EXPORTS TO USA...

Blue crabs threatened by oil spills in Venezuela









By Girish Gupta and Isaac Urrutia

MARACAIBO, Venezuela | Fri Aug 5, 2011 9:54am EDT

(Reuters Life!) - Venezuelan fishermen inspect their catch of blue crabs on the edge of Lake Maracaibo, concerned about the greasy oil stains covering their shells.

The crustaceans will be processed and shipped to seafood restaurants in Maryland and New York where they are considered a delicacy. But scientists and fishermen in the state of Zulia in northwestern Venezuela worry that the crabs may not be safe for consumption.

"The crabs are stained with oil," said fisherman Cesar Burgos as he weighed the day's catch in the fishing village of Barranquitas. "I don't know at what point it becomes harmful."

Pollution in Lake Maracaibo has been a problem for decades. In recent weeks the area has been blighted by several leaks from tangled pipes, corroding pumps and other oil installations that crisscross the lake.

"The main source of …

FUTURE OF DESALINATION EXPLORED AS "ONE THIRD OF THE WORLD LIVES IN WATER STRESSED REGIONS"...

Future of seawater desalination studied

by Staff Writers
South Bend, Ind. (UPI) Aug 4, 2011


disclaimer: image is for illustration purposes only


U.S. researchers have reviewed the current state of seawater desalination technology and its potential as a sustainable solution to global water shortages.

William Phillip of the University of Notre Dame and Menachem Elimelech at Yale University analyzed how seawater desalination technology has advanced in the past 30 years and in what ways the technology can be improved, a Notre Dame release said Thursday.

"At present, one-third of the world's population lives in water stressed countries," Phillip said. "Increasing population, contamination of fresh water sources and climate change will cause this percentage to increase over the coming decade."

Despite major advancements in desalination technologies, the process is still more energy intensive than conventional technologies for the treatment of freshwater, the researcher…

POWERFUL STORM HEADING TOWARDS CHINA...PACKING WINDS OF 162 KMS PER HOUR...MUIFA EXPECTED TO MAKE LANDFALL BY THE WEEKEND...

China braces for approaching typhoon Muifa

by Staff Writers
Shanghai (AFP) Aug 5, 2011





China called more than 7,000 fishing boats back to port on Friday in preparation for Typhoon Muifa, one of the most powerful storms to hit the region in recent years, state media said.

Authorities in the commercial capital Shanghai warned bullet train services might be affected by the storm -- a sensitive issue after a deadly high-speed train crash two weeks ago that was initially blamed on weather conditions.

Muifa, which was packing winds of up to 162 kilometres per hour (100 miles per hour), is expected to make landfall on China's east coast at the weekend.

The National Meteorological Centre said the typhoon was forecast to land in Zhejiang or Jiangsu province, both of which neighbour Shanghai, on Saturday evening or during the day on Sunday.

The official Xinhua news agency said 7,000 fishing boats had been called back to harbour and local governments were preparing for possible evacuation of …

TURKISH "SUPER GROUP" PRIMED WITH MASSIVE CAPITAL IN ACQUISITION MODE...

Yildirim eyed Hapag

Turkish industrial and shipping group Yildirim considered an investment in German container line Hapag-Lloyd before settling on French competitor CMA CGM as a better choice, the group’s president and chief executive said today.






Yildirim also aborted its own plans to launch a container line once the CMA CGM opportunity arose, says Robert Yuksel Yildirim, who was speaking at an industry event outside of Turkey for the first time.

“Our banks also showed us Hapag-Lloyd first, but we chose CMA because we believe it was a better investment,” Yildirim said at Marine Money Hamburg, drawing a light murmur from the largely German audience.

Yildirim to many appeared to come from nowhere to seal the $500m investment in CMA CGM in January, after a few other investment propositions to the French liner giant failed to result in an agreement.

The Turks get a 20% stake through convertible bonds redeemable in five years. But, as Yildirim made clear in his address, the company did no…