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COLOMBIA PLANS MASSIVE INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT THAT COULD CATAPULT THE COUNTRY'S EFFICIENCY FIVE-FOLD WITHIN THE NEXT 5 YEARS...

Colombia’s infrastructure

Bridging the gaps

A creaking transport network is holding back Colombia’s growth. How fast can Juan Manuel Santos improve it?

Sep 17th 2011 | MELGAR | from the print edition










ARTICULATED lorries must take turns to pass one at a time over the narrow steel bridge spanning the Sumapaz river in the town of Melgar, south-west of Bogotá, Colombia’s capital. 
The bridge carries the main road from the Pacific port of Buenaventura to central and northern Colombia. Transporters loaded with Great Wall pickups coming from China cross paths with coking coal on its way to the United States, Peru and Mexico. This bottleneck will be eased later this month, when a 4.5km (2.8-mile) dual-carriageway bypass with wider bridges will open.

 But across the country the “monumental backwardness” of Colombia’s transport network—as Juan Martín, president of the Colombian Infrastructure Chamber, puts it—is perhaps the biggest obstacle to economic growth.


The costs of Colombia’s deficient infr…

BRAZIL MANGO VETERAN ALBERT PEREZ OF CONTINENTAL FRESH EXPECTS ANOTHER STABLE SEASON OUT OF BRAZIL...

Albert Perez & his lovely family. Photo courtesy of facebook.

Continental Fresh concentrates on Brazilian mangos

By Tim Linden | September 01, 2011


Florida-based Continental Fresh is beginning its heaviest time of the year for mango supplies, and Managing Partner Albert Perez expects 2011 to be a carbon copy of 2010.

“Right now, we are importing 100 percent of our mangos from Brazil,” he said on Tuesday, Sept. 6. “That is our biggest program. 
At this point, it looks very similar to last year [in terms of volume]. We expanded our program with one grower and added a new label.” But he also said that overall volume should remain about the same for the firm, which operates from Coconut Grove, FL, because Continental Fresh is no longer working with one of last year’s growers.

“Suemi” and “Fino Fruits” are the two Brazil mango brands that Continental will represent this year.

 “‘Suemi’ is the label that we have expanded since last year. It has developed very well over the last several year…

ISABEL FREELAND OF COAST TROPICAL EXPECTS BRAZIL MANGOES TO HOLD THEIR VALUE INSPITE OF FALLING FOB PRICES AT THE MOMENT...EXPECTS ECUADOR & PERU TO START LATE THIS YEAR...

Coast Tropical Executive expects good marketing situation for South American deal
By Tim Linden | September 01, 2011


Mango sales veteran Isabel Freeland, vice president of San Diego-based Coast Tropical, believes that things are lining up very well for a very strong South America mango deal this year.

“Ecuador is a little bit late, which should help Brazil. And we are expecting Peru to be as much as three weeks late, which will help Ecuador,” she said. “Each of those counties will have a little larger window to market their fruit this year, which should help growers in all three countries.”

Coast Tropical shifted its production from Mexico to Brazil in September, and expects Brazil fruit through the end of October. “So far the volume has been very good,” she said on Monday, September 12. “The quality is superb ... better than last year. We should see a steady flow of volume of gorgeous, red mangos ... through October.”

Though the fruit is in good demand and was returning a good market …

REPORT PAID FOR BY NATIONAL MANGO BOARD PROVES THAT NMB HAS BEEN WASTING TIME PROMOTING THE WRONG VARIETIES...

Are mangoes the new banana?



Marketplace, Monday, September 19, 2011


Major food companies, consumers are getting sweet on the exotic fruit -- as mangoes become more mainstream.


VIEW A SLIDESHOW

Mangoes sold at a mango festival in South Florida include these Puerto Rican mangoes. (Lisa Matuska / Marketplace)


KAI RYSSDAL: There's news of a tentative deal here in Southern California that's going to avoid a strike at three major supermarket chains. It'll keep more 60,000 workers on the job and stores open. Next time you happen to be in a grocery store, take a swing by the produce section. Find the mangoes, give one a squeeze, take it home if you so choose, and ask yourself this: mangos, have they always been here?

Lisa Matuska has more.

LISA MATUSKA: Let's start with the banana. In the early 1900s, the United Fruit Company transformed the banana. The company, now known as Chiquita, managed to turn this exotic yellow fruit into an international commodity with the help of railroads,…

SOLAR POWER DRIVES FRUIT DEHYDRATOR...GIVING KENYA'S MANGO PRODUCERS HOPE AGAINST TRADITIONAL CROP LOSSES...

Unique mango drier offers rich pickings for small producers







Small-scale farmers contribute significantly to Kenya’s mango production, but these growers suffer huge post-harvest losses that eat up to 45 per cent of the harvested fruit because the crop is highly perishable. File




By JOHN NJAGI (email the author)

Posted Tuesday, September 20 2011 at 00:00







Over the past few years, mango production has gone up significantly, earning the country over Sh7 billion from exports last year alone



With small-scale farmers contributing significantly to this production, the growers have suffered post-harvest losses that eat up to 45 per cent of the harvested fruit.


The massive losses are caused by lack of innovative and affordable means of value addition to improve the shelf-life of the perishable horticultural product and give farmers a competitive edge.


But those challenges may be overcome through a simple innovation— a solar mango drier that costs between Sh50,000 and Sh100,000, depending on size a…

MANGOES HIGHLIGHT IRRADIATION IN THE NEWS...

Published by the Minnesota Beef Council









Quotable Quotes:

"Illness causing organisms are always present. Irradiation - harmless to humans - will kill them, not inspection."

Elizabeth Whelan, President, American Council on Science and Health







"Federal and state health officials have certainly studied this food safety measure (irradiation), and they emphasize that outbreaks of this nature will continue to occur until we employ food irradiation as a final safeguard."

Russell Currier, DVM; President, American Veterinary Medical History Society






"The United States and Pakistan have worked closely to open this new market to mango growers in Pakistan and make additional choices available to U.S. consumers. Irradiation treatments allow USDA to facilitate the safe importation of mangoes from Pakistan while protecting U.S. agriculture from harmful pests and diseases."


Tom Vilsack, US Secretary of Agriculture












IN THIS ISSUE:




FSIS Issues Public Health Alert For Frozen, Fresh…

CITY OF CINCINATTI, OHIO FIGHTING TO KEEP CHIQUITA BRANDS AS CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA PUTS PRSSURE ON TO LURE BANANA GIANT...

But many of the company's partners aren't local


US: Chiquita relocation would ripple



The global nature of Chiquita's business means it doesn't use too many local marketing, branding or research firms.
 Most affected by a move would be the lawyers, accountants, auditors, caterers, hotels and dry cleaners that support a large corporation, and the universities that fill a firm's pipeline of talent. 
News sources in Charlotte and Boca Raton, Fla., have reported offerings of state, county and city tax incentives to lure the international marketer of fruits and vegetables. 
The city of Cincinnati also has an offer on the table, which officials say is larger than the Charlotte deal. 
It includes possible solutions to Chiquita's two biggest complaints - poor flight service from the Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport and the lack of a bilingual workforce, Councilman Chris Bortz says. 

At stake are 330 jobs with salaries above $100,000 a year. 

There's also …

JUST FOODS EDITORIAL: NEWS FROM AROUND THE FOOD WORLD...( September 19, 2011)

Editorial


The speculation over the future of Metro Group's chief executive intensified last week, casting doubts over the direction of the world's third-largest retailer.




The German retail giant's CEO, Dr Eckhard Cordes, has lost the backing of one of the company's key shareholders, Haniel. 

The Metro chief's contract runs out next October and the head of Haniel, the German industrial holding company that owns 34% of the retailer, has already told Cordes that he no longer has his support.



Cordes, however, said last week that he is confident he can extend his contract and said his moves to reorganise Metro were not yet complete. 
And, in a further twist, over the weekend it was reported in Germany that a second key shareholder in Metro, the Schmidt-Ruthenbeck family, wants Cordes to stay.



The apparent tension at the top of Metro has echoes with Cordes' appointment as chief executive in 2007

Back then, Cordes, who ironically was then Haniel's chief executive, had …

ISRAELI TOMMY ATKINS PRICES DROPPING IN EUROPEAN MARKET...

CENTRAL BANKERS & WORLD'S TOP ECONOMISTS GRAPPLE WITH JUST HOW MUCH INFLATION IS NECESSARY TO JUMP START FLAGGING GLOBAL ECONOMIES...

Bernanke Joins King Tolerating Inflation to Revice Economy







By Scott Lanman and Simon Kennedy 




- Sep 19, 2011 2:18 AM PT





U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke and Bank of England governor Mervyn King. Dimier/Bloomberg










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Aug. 23 (Bloomberg) -- Roger Myerson, a Nobel laureate and a professor at the University of Chicago, discusses the outlook for the U.S. economy, the euro-region's sovereign debt crisis and the challenges facing Libya. He speaks with David Tweed in Lindau, Germany, on Bloomberg Television's "The Pulse." (Source: Bloomberg)






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June 15 (Bloomberg) -- John Ryding, chief economist at RDQ Economics LLC, talks about Federal Reserve monetary policy and prospects for adoption of an explicit inflation target by the central bank. Ryding, speaking with Betty Liu, Dominic Chu and Michael McKee on Bloomberg Television's "In the Loop," also discusses the U.S. consumer-price index for May and the impact of monetary policy on commodity p…