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SOIL RECLAMATION IS CRITICAL TO RECOVERING YIELDS FOR MANGO FARMERS ...

Healthy Soil with Abundant Microorganisms, Good Humus and Tilth

Vigorous Native Plant Establishment and Growth

Soil Stabilization




1. Healthy Soil


"Most failures of plants to grow vigorously can be traced to improper management of the soil."

Fertilizing Plants vs. Improving Soil

Fertilizing Plants vs. Improving Soil 
The most important features of soil are the size of its rock particles and oxygen and moisture. The basic nutrients plants require are minerals present naturally in rock particles. Any shortage of nutrients limits plant growth. However, there is a considerable difference between fertilizing plants and improving soil.

Fertilizing is a short-term effort, that must be repeated constantly, made to get plants to respond rapidly. Improving soil addresses the self-sustaining health of plants, making soil sufficiently rich that eventually plants get all the nutrients they need in a natural and sustained manner.

Clearly, soil improvement makes more sense and is more cost efficient…

THE IMPORTANCE OF REINCORPORATING ORGANIC MATTER INTO SOILS ...

Chapter 6. Key factors in sustained food production



INCREASED PLANT PRODUCTIVITY

Plant productivity is linked closely to organic matter (Bauer and Black, 1994). Consequently, landscapes with variable organic matter usually show variations in productivity. Plants growing in well-aerated soils are less stressed by drought or excess water. In soils with less compaction, plant roots can penetrate and flourish more readily. High organic matter increases productivity and, in turn, high productivity increases organic matter.



INCREASED FERTILIZER EFFICIENCY

The two major soil fertility constraints of the West African savannah and in the subhumid and semi-arid regions of SSA are low inherent nutrient reserve and rapid acidification under continuous cultivation as a consequence of low buffering or cation exchange capacity (Jones and Wild, 1975). Generally, these constraints are tackled by applying chemical fertilizers and lime. However, the application of inorganic fertilizers on depleted soils oft…

THE BIOCHAR ECONOMY SIMPLIFIED ...

by Sam Carana



September 26, 2011 11:18 PM EDT






The idea behind the "Biochar Economy" is to try to embed biochar production into as many processes as possible, as pictured on above image, from open source ecology.

In carbon-negative 'Biochar Economies', biochar is proposed to also act as a kind of local 'gold standard' for local currency supply.



BIOCHAR IS AN IMPORTANT STEP TO REBUILDING QUALITY SOILS FOR MANGO FARMERS ...

by Sam Carana

Biochar

October 22, 2007 08:28 PM EDT 
(Updated: July 14, 2009 07:40 AM EDT)





Reducing greenhouse gases

Reducing greenhouse gases is one of the biggest challenges of our times. The main greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide.

Over half of all greenhouse gas emissions is caused by the use of fossil fuel - an obvious way to achieve reductions in emissions therefore is to shift from fossil fuel to renewable energy.

In the U.S., most nitrous oxide emissions are also energy-related, i.e. caused by transport, coal-fired power plants, etc. Therefore, these emissions can also be avoided by shifting to renewable energy.

Globally, most nitrous oxide emissions are caused by agricultural practices. Some 70% of anthropogenic nitrous oxide emissions is caused solely by the practice of adding N-fertilizers (i.e. nitrogen-based fertilizers) to the soil. It is therefore important to also look at ways to reduce the need for N-fertilizers.

Pyrolysis of biomass can achieve jus…

THE GLOBAL MANGO INDUSTRY MUST WORK ON IMPROVING QUALITY OF SOIL ...

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California




www.mangoworldmagazine.blogspot.com








November 06, 2011














One of the cornerstones of the IMO is and always has been a scoring system for quality soils.


This started out in 2000 as a copy of what the International Coffee Organization (ICO) had for coffee growers around the world.


As mango growers continue to deplete soils, this model is no longer enough.


The mango grower associations around the world must pay attention to soil nutrient information and stick to a program of replenishing soil where mangoes are grown.




Much in the way that nutritional data is scored on mangoes, it is critical to start with the soils on the farms that mangoes are grown on.




There is an optimum profile that must be met in order to produce premium mangoes.




Just like Colombian coffee reaps a premium, mango growers could distinguish themselves by scoring the soil content on a farm by farm basis.




The global mango industry must start with soi…