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Showing posts from December 11, 2011

THE SHAKY USA MARKET MAY TURN OUT TO BE BEST MARKET FOR SOUTH AMERICAN MANGO EXPORTERS ...

The economy and stimulus
Looking up


The economy makes headway. So do efforts to renew stimulus



Dec 10th 2011 | WASHINGTON, DC | from the print edition










THREE months ago Barack Obama was firmly in the dock over news that no net jobs were created in August. Some gloomy people even saw a double-dip recession on the way.


America, it turns out, was not on the verge of recession, and it still isn’t. Subsequent revisions show that 104,000 jobs were in fact created in August. Later months have also been revised upwards, and in November payrolls grew by 120,000, or 0.1%. On December 2nd the government also reported that the unemployment rate had declined sharply to 8.6%, the lowest figure for two-and-a-half years, down from 9%.



November, it seems, was a very good month. Retailers reported solid sales on and after “black Friday”, the day after Thanksgiving on November 24th that marks the traditional start of the Christmas shopping season. Car sales were at their strongest since the days of the cash-fo…

ECUADOR'S PREMIER ORGANIC MANGO EXPORTER

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, california








www.mangoworldmagazine.blogspot.com












December 11, 2011













PILOT S.A.








Ecuador's premier organic mango exporter this season.




First arrivals took place on the 31st of October.


The majority of organic mangoes (40,128 (4kg) cartons have arrived on the west coast USA.


The importer of record on the west coast USA is Pacific Organic Produce of  San Francisco, California.




The east coast USA has received 15,048 cartons with the first container arriving at the Port of NY/NJ on the 14th of November 2011.


Albert's Organics of New York, is handling sales of the Ecuadorian organic mangoes on the east coast USA.
















CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE: THE MANGO MONEY TREE ...

COP17: Durban delusions


By Michael Kile - posted Monday, 12 December 2011






"They want the KP (Kyoto Protocol) rules but they don't want the KP. In Africa, if you want the mango you also must like the mango tree. If you want (the carbon dioxide) markets to continue, if you want strong and robust rules, then keep the mango tree."  ~  Dr Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, Chair of Africa Group



Changes in the weather and climate used to be blamed on gods or demons, but no longer. If something nasty happens - meteorologically and climatically - in the developing world today, a cacophony of voices invariably insists it is the developed world's fault. Most delegates at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's (UNFCCC) seventeenth annual meeting of its Conference of the Parties (COP-17) in Durban, South Africa, agreed with this alleged causal connection.


Dr.Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, the Democratic Republic of Congo's environment minister, was one of them. Referring to the desi…

NORTH QUEENSLAND: SKETCHY QUALITY BRINGING DOWN MANGO MARKET .....

ABC Rural Report

Rural News and Information for North and Far North Queensland, Monday 12th December 2011

By Miriam Hall,










Poor quality mangoes dragging price down



Miriam Hall

Mango lovers will be pleased to hear they'll be paying a little less for the fruit this year.

Poor weather last season meant there was a serious drop in the number of mangoes on the market, which pushed the price up significantly for consumers.

This year there's enough of the fruit around, but some of it isn't the best of quality, which is lowering the market price for producers.

NATIVES NEED TO EAT MORE MANGOES IN PARADISE ...

Stay healthy, eat fruits

Mary Rauto
Monday, December 12, 2011



Timoci Tuisinu of Caubati, selling mangoes and pineapples along Nokonoko Rd in Laucala Beach Estate in Nasinu on Saturday. Picture: ELIKI NUKUTABU





INCLUDE a lot of healing food in your diet these holidays - that's the advice from non-communicable diseases adviser Doctor Isimeli Tukana.


He said as Christmas approaches, fresh fruit and vegetable are in abundance in the market and cheap.


Dr Tukana advised parents to keep processed foods to a minimum and instead of buying ice cream, make fruit salad.

"One of the problems we have in Fiji is the lack of consumption of eating fruit and vegetable," he said



"Only 1.25 per cent of people aged 15 years and over eat the right amount of fruit and vegetable serving per day.



"This is five servings - three servings of vegetable and two servings of fruit with each serving amounting to 80 grams."



Dr Tukana said people should eat more vegetables because it contained less su…

NO END IN SIGHT FOR CLIMATE CHANGE DEBATE....

IMO NOTE:
From our friends at:

Andrew Aziz
Managing Editor, ICTSD Periodicals & Editor, Bridges Trade BioRes
International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development
International Environment House 2
Chemin de Balexert 7
1219 Geneva, Switzerland
tel: +41 (0)22-917-8925 ; fax: +41 (0)22-917-8093 ;





10th December 2011


Durban Climate Meet Marks Turning Point for Trade Issues





According to Robert O. Keohane and David G. Victor, “the ‘climate change problem’ is actually many distinct problems-each with its own attributes, administrative challenges and distinctive political constituencies.” 

This truism, exhaustively scrutinised by academics in search of optimal or first best solutions to international cooperative action, has been loudly attested to in Durban this week. With some dramatic tones in speeches and actions on Friday night, linkages to trade were not spared from the resulting acrimony.


Concerns that actions taken in the name of climate may create distortions to competitiveness are a mai…