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Showing posts from January 10, 2012

FDA FLEXES MUSCLE AND SENDS OJC PRICES SOARING ...

Orange-Juice Futures Surge



By LESLIE JOSEPHS And LIAM PLEVEN







The market for orange juice futures received another jolt after the federal government said some Brazilian imports contained a potentially harmful fungicide.


Bloomberg News



An FDA spokeswoman said a juice company anonymously called the government agency late last month to report the presence of the fungicide carbendazim. Above, workers inspect oranges on the production line at a Sucocitrico Cutrale orange juice plant in Araraquara, Brazil, in November.



The news on Tuesday sent prices of the January contract soaring 9.7% to a record settlement as traders fretted that the appearance of the fungicide could lead to a sharp reduction in Brazilian orange juice imports.




Traders already had driven prices higher this year amid worries that a recent cold snap in Florida had damaged crops. In just six trading days, frozen orange juice concentrate futures have soared 26%, settling at $2.1275 a pound on Tuesday on the ICE Futures U.S. exchange…

PERU STRUGGLES WITH IT'S OWN IDENTITY IN THE MANGO INDUSTRY ...

Peru tackling local mango issues to bolster presence in Asia, U.S.



January 11th, 2012




While seasonality is always hanging over any fruit producer, Peru’s mango industry is particularly susceptible compared to its counterparts in Ecuador and Brazil. Made up of a plethora of small players, coordination and technology access are difficult, but the industry is making headway in new markets. 

At www.freshfruitportal.com we speak with Association of Peruvian Mango Producers and Exporters (APEM) manager Juan Carlos Rivera, who says the industry still has issues to get on top of at home.






APEM manager Juan Carlos Rivera







When asked about why Peru’s mango exports are down this season, Rivera is quick to point out the situation is nothing out of the ordinary and shipments are going as planned; after oversupply pushed down prices in previous seasons, lower volumes could be in the best interests of growers anyway.



While associations such as APEM are able to predict season forecasts and provide informatio…

CHIAPAS BASED REVOLUTIONARIES STAY CLEAR OF DRUG TRADE IN MEXICO ...

How Mexico's Zapatista guerrillas stayed clear of organized crime


Mexico's Zapatistas are distinct from most other rebels groups in Latin America, having remained within a democratic framework without getting involved in organized crime to secure funding.

By Geoffrey Ramsey, Guest blogger / January 10, 2012








Because of its status as a major theater for proxy conflicts during the cold war, Latin America has a long history of leftist insurgencies. Over the past two decades, however, these left wing groups largely abandoned armed struggle as a means of gaining power, turning instead to peaceful electoral politics. In some countries they have been immensely successful. Indeed, the current ruling parties of Nicaragua, El Salvador, Brazil, and Uruguay can all trace their roots -- at least in part -- back to guerrilla insurgencies of the 1970s and 80s.




Nevertheless, a handful of guerrilla movements persist in the region. The most well-known examples are inColombia, which is home to the Re…

MEXICAN CRIME ELEMENT SEEKS TO INFILTRATE PERU ...

Peru to Place Visa Restrictions on Mexicans to Stem Criminal Flow


Written by Edward Fox







Peru's attorney general announced that all Mexicans entering the country will now need a visa, after nearly 100 Mexican nationals were investigated by Peru for links to organized crime in the last two years.




Attorney General Jose Antonio Pelaez Bardales revealed that 98 Mexicans had been investigated in the two-year period for alleged links to criminal organizations. As a result, he believes it necessary to introduce visa requirements to stem the flow of criminals entering the country.


Pelaez stressed that the measure would be taken "without prejudice to the decency and honesty shown by many of the Mexican citizens who come to Peru," reported El Comercio.



The 98 Mexicans represent 10 percent of the total number of people investigated for links to drug trafficking and organized crime during that period.
InSight Crime Analysis



Mexican criminal groups are likely building up an increased presen…

INDIA LOOKS TO DOUBLE TRADE WITH LATIN AMERICA ...

http://blogs.ft.com/beyond-brics/2012/01/10/india-eyes-50bn-latam-trade-target/#ixzz1j7fRH2dP


India eyes $50bn LatAm trade target
January 10, 2012 9:03 pm 

by Jason Abbruzzese





India is hoping to reach $50bn in trade with Latin America by 2014, according to a recent interview with Rengaraj Viswanathan, Indian ambassador to Argentina, Uruguay and Paraguay.


The move would more than double current trade between the markets, which totaled a little more than $24bn in 2010, with India exporting $10.7bn and importing $14bn with LatAm.




The interview echoes preferential trade agreements signed between India and various countries including Chile and the Mercosur trade region, which provide a series of market props including tariff concessions on a wide variety of products.




“There is a unique opening for India at this time,” Mr Viswanathan said. “The Latin Americans are disillusioned with Europe and US who are facing crisis after crisis. They are reassessing the China euphoria after their industries and…

USA PORTS: WHY LA/LB WILL ALWAYS MATTER...EVEN POST PANAMAX ...

Scraping Bottom: How Deep Are They? [Interactive Graphic]




Jan 9, 2012 8:54PM GMT The Journal of Commerce Online - News Story
 | 




The budget cutting sweeping through Washington won’t help U.S. ports looking to prepare for the big, new ships that will start transiting the expanded Panama Canal in less than three years. 

But that’s just one of a myriad of obstacles depth-challenged ports face. 

In some cases, the Army Corps of Engineers’ hands are tied — its funding cut or diverted to other non-infrastructure needs. 


In others, environmental advocates are tying up approved projects for months — if not longer — beyond their expected start dates. 

The race is on to 2014. 

Who will be ready and who won’t? 

Click on a port for more information.


KEEPING TRACK OF THE MEDFLY IN USA: THE MOST DESTRUCTIVE OF ALL FRUIT FLIES ...

Mediterranean Fruit Fly



About the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata[Wiedemann] or Medfly)

The Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) originated in Africa and is found in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. The Medfly has spread throughout the Mediterranean region, southern Europe, the Middle East, Western Australia, South and Central America and Hawaii. The first of numerous U.S. mainland infestations occurred in Florida in 1929.

The Medfly has the widest host range of any pest fruit fly and is considered the most important agricultural pest in the world. It has been recorded infesting a wide range of commercial and garden fruits, nuts and vegetables, including apple, avocado, bell pepper, citrus, melon, peach, plum and tomato.




What Does the Medfly Look Like?The Medfly is smaller than a house fly. It has a blackish thorax marked with silver, a tan abdomen with darker stripes and clear wings with light brown bands and gray flecks. The eggs are white, very small and elong…

STAGE NINE UPDATE: DAKAR RALLY 2012 ...

WHAT THE BI-LO & WINN DIXIE MERGER MEANS FOR RETAIL IN THE USA ...

Talking shop: An uncertain future for Bi-Lo and Winn-Dixie

By: Sam Webb | 10 January 2012





Just before Christmas, US retailers Bi-Lo announced a deal to buy local peer Winn-Dixie Stores, creating an organisation of almost 700 grocery stores in eight states throughout the south-east of the country. Sam Webb speaks to industry watchers about the move, and what it will mean for the new company.




US retailers Bi-Lo and Winn-Dixie Stores are organisations that have endured challenges in recent years. Both have battled bankruptcy and have been dogged by sliding profits.




Bi-Lo applied for Chapter 11 in 2009 after the credit crunch prevented the retailer from refinancing its debt. It sold assets to Delhaize and emerged from bankruptcy a year later after securing financing from a number of parties, including investment vehicle Lone Star Funds, its majority shareholder.



Winn-Dixie's move into Chapter 11 came four years earlier after competition hit the business. After a restructuring of the busine…