TOP STORIES PAST 7 DAYS

Thursday, January 26, 2012

RISING EXPECTATIONS IN PERU KEEP MARGINS RAZOR THIN FOR MARKETERS ....








Peru expects mango price hike in 2012




January 27th, 2012








Peru’s export promotion commission has forecast mango prices could increase by 70% this season, following a shorter supply brought on by this year’s alternating bearing, website Agraria.pe reported.


                                                                                                                                                                   






Promperu agro-industry department coordinator William Arteaga Donayre, says prices for Peruvian mangoes, asparagus and avocados have already risen significantly in recent weeks.




Arteaga Donayre points out the high prices have nothing to do with any kind of bonanza in the face of the U.S. economic crisis, but has more to do with the counterseason.



The National Mango Board’s (NMB) latest crop report highlights that combined Peruvian and Ecuadorian mango shipments to the U.S. fell 2% last week on the previous week.




Peru sent 715,402 boxes of mangoes to the U.S. last week, and is expected to send 752,578 boxes and 687,943 boxes in the next two weeks respectively.



The crop report shows that Peruvian Kent mangoes achieved price increases across the board on entry in Philadelphia (4.3%), south Florida (8.4%) and southern California (2%).





Related story. Peru tackling local mango issues to bolster presence in Asia, U.S.

www.freshfruitportal.com






NICARAGUA IS A SEA OF TRANQUILITY IN CENTRAL AMERICA ...











Crime in Nicaragua
A surprising safe haven
How Central America’s poorest country became one of its safest

Jan 28th 2012 | MANAGUA | from the print edition





LYING between Colombia’s coca bushes and Mexico’s cocaine traffickers, Central America is a choke point on the drugs trail. 


In 2010 the smugglers ensured that Honduras, El Salvador, Belize and Guatemala were among the world’s seven most violent countries. 


Costa Rica and Panama are richer and safer. But since 2007 their murder rates have respectively risen by a third and nearly doubled.




Amid this inferno Nicaragua, the poorest country in mainland Latin America, is remarkably safe. Whereas Honduras’s murder rate in 2010 was 82 per 100,000 people, the world’s highest in over a decade, Nicaragua’s was just 13, unchanged in five years. That means it is now less violent than booming Panama, and may soon be safer than Costa Rica, a tourist haven. 



What explains the relative peace?



Spending is not the answer. With a GDP per head of $1,100, Nicaragua can afford only 18 policemen for every 10,000 people, the lowest ratio in the region. (Panama has 50.) Earning $120 per month, its officers are also the worst-paid. Nor does Nicaragua spend much on prisons: it jails just 120 people per 100,000, compared with 390 in El Salvador. This may work in its favour: El Salvador’s violent mara gangs look for recruits in the country’s packed prisons.





Nicaragua’s distaste for its neighbours’ mano dura (“iron fist”) policies grew out of the 1979 revolt against the Somoza dictatorship. 



“We didn’t know how to be police. We only knew we didn’t want to be like the Somozan Guard,” says Aminta Granera, a former nun and guerrilla who leads the force. Officers are aided by 100,000 volunteers. They include law and psychology students; 10,000 former gang members, who mentor youths via baseball in the barrios; and nearly 4,000 domestic-violence victims, who persuade women to speak out. Amnesty International, an NGO, highlights the frequency of rape, which is made worse by a blanket ban on abortion: last year a 12-year-old was forced to give birth to her stepfather’s baby.



 Still, confidence in the police is the highest in Latin America after Chile.



The drug war could yet reach Nicaragua. The country’s low wages may attract kingpins just as they have wooed legitimate investment: smugglers charge under $500 to drive a car of cocaine from Managua to Mexico. The gangs may only have been kept out by the country’s ropy ports. The police say they broke up 14 drug-trafficking cells in the first half of 2011 alone, up from 16 in all of 2010 and one or two a year until 2005. Ms Granera says that such plots often include Mexicans. The Zetas, a brutal Mexican mob, could easily ignite more violence if they move in.



A cloud hangs over the police’s leadership. Ms Granera is justly popular. But like many officials in Daniel Ortega’s government, she has ignored the limit on her five-year term. That deadline passed in September, only for Mr Ortega—who himself began an unconstitutional third term this month—to reappoint her. The opposition complains that the police do little to stop the periodic rampages of mobs loyal to Mr Ortega: in 2010 a Holiday Inn was attacked with makeshift mortars while the opposition held a meeting there. Mr Ortega has already hollowed out most Nicaraguan institutions. It would be a crime if the country’s police suffer the same fate.


http://www.economist.com/node/21543492 










LACK OF COLD CHAIN PUTS EARLY MANGO PRODUCERS OF INDIA TO SACRIFICE FRUIT TO SPECULATORS ...





 





A raw deal for Orissa mango





Debabrata Mohanty : Bhubaneswar, Fri Jan 27 2012, 03:32 hrs









Growers in Orissa rue their mangoes get a raw deal outside the state — even if they are the fist-sized, yellow Dasheharis or the reddish Gulab Khas, and even when their produce flood the markets at least a month before most varieties arrive from other states.


The script runs thus every year: Traders from Bihar and Uttar Pradesh queue up outside mango orchards of non-descript Orissa villages around April-end to pick truckloads of Dasheharis. They buy them dirt cheap — for Rs 5-8 per kg — from farmers who are anxious that their produce will rot away, thanks to lack of cold storage facilities here.




When the same Dashehari is wheeled into the mandis of Uttar Pradesh, Delhi or Haryana, it is sold for Rs 40-50 per kg. What is worse is that the traders mostly don’t acknowledge that the mangoes are from Orissa, passing them off as from UP or Bihar, where the king of fruits is not ready for picking till May-end.




Apart from Dashehari, Orissa also produces Amrapali, Langra, Himsagar, Bombay Green, Lat Sundari, Totapuri, Banganpalli, Neelum and Gulab Khas varieties.




“It is these traders who we seek to eliminate from the process. They underpay the farmers and don’t even give us any credit. Though we are among the top 10 mango producers in India, our potential is underutilised due to lack of proper post-harvest management and intelligent marketing,” said Sanjiv Chadha, state director, horticulture department.





In 2010-11, Orissa commercially produced 6.42 lakh (x100,000) tonnes of mango (642 Thousand Tonnes) (16,050,000 (4kg) cartons) on 1.9 lakh hectares, (190 thousand hectares) while neighbouring Andhra Pradesh, India’s topmost producer, produced 41.39 lakh tonnes.
(over one billion 4kg cartons!)







TIGHT MARGINS FOR AUSTRALIAN MANGO GROWERS MAKE ASSESSMENTS HARD TO SWALLOW ....






The Territory recorded a massive mango season in 2011. 




Mango grower threatens court action


By Carl Curtain

Friday, 27/01/2012









A Northern Territory mango grower is threatening to take the Federal Government to court if it approves an industry levy increase.


The Australian mango industry held a vote late last year with the majority of of mango growers supporting an increase to levies.




If the Federal Government approves the proposal, mango growers would have to pay 30 cents per tray for industry marketing and research.



But Alex Carolan says production margins are already tight, and growers will go out of business.




"I think there will be a revolt against it. I think a lot of farmers will decide not to pay it," he says.




"If it's a matter of going out the gate or surviving or going to court with the minister, I think a lot of farmers would go to court with the minister than pay the levy."




PERU MUST WORK ON SOILS FOR A BETTER SEASON NEXT YEAR ...














The most efficient nutrients (soil & leaf) assessment & recommendation methods for agriculture crop....Managers must have basic know how about it....



1.The total contents of nutrients in leaves, and plant parts, compared with Critical Nutrient Range (CNR), provide the basis for interpretation. T



2.Diagnosis and Recommendation Integrated System (DRIS) is also used for interpreting plant analysis data, based on a comparison of calculated elemental ratio indices with established norms.



3.The Plant Analysis with Standardized Scores (PASS), the most efficient diagnosis systems, has not been effectively utilized



4.TSFR (Tri State Fertilizer Recommendation) is already on this picture
— with Ningga Yoko Dumz.




By Hadi Laghari
Technical Manager
ASSIM Agricultural Farm
Pakistan



KENYA MANGO GROWERS HONING PRODUCTION SKILLS AND WORK ON ERRADICATING FRUIT FLY ....










EXCHANGE RATE: 10 Kenya Shilling = .10 USD






 




Nairobi Star (Nairobi)
Kenya: Farmers Set to Make Sh180 Million From Mangoes

Kirimi Murithi







26 January 2012





 


Mango farmers in the country will make Sh180 million in the first quarter of this year through an initiative by Techno serve called Project Nurture. Techno serve project agronomist Isaiah Kirema said they will have purchased 18,000 metric tonnes of mangoes at Sh10 each by the close of the season.




The money from the sales will go directly to the farmers. Kirema said the improved production will enable the farmers to produce more next season. 



Project Nurture deals with boosting production of mangoes and sweet passion fruits and it has two more seasons to go before closure of its term.



Kirema says they anticipate farmers will earn more income because they target to double up production in the remaining two terms. 



Techno serve seeks to ensure farmers productivity is increased through establishment of demo plots for showcasing the right procedures and technologies for farming.



 "The biggest threat to export markets is traceability and the kind of chemicals used for spraying which leave high residue levels", says Kirema. "Especially for the domestic market farmers might be spraying chemicals that have very high residue levels. For mangoes we see farmers spraying for fruit flies at time of maturity and we want them to be using traps",he adds.




Relevant Links
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Kenya
Agribusiness




He says they have collaborated with ISIPE who have developed fruit fly chemical Methyl euginol which attracts male fruit flies even a kilometre away. They encourage production of yellow passion fruits which are resistant to pests' infections and require less spraying. 



They train the purple passion fruit farmers on the best way to spray so as to maintain minimal residue levels for the fruits to be accepted in the markets. 



"This has encouraged exporters to seek for mangoes that are produced by farmers that project nurture is working with", he said. 


They are targeting to exploit new markets in Europe since their main market has been the Middle East. 


He says once they eradicate the mango weevil and fruit fly menace they will be able to export the produce to Europe which has a more lucrative market.



http://allafrica.com/stories/201201261427.html

SOCONUSCO, CHIAPAS, MEXICO.....HOME TO THE FIRST ATAULFO MANGOES TO BE EXPORTED.....






Chiapas is home to nearly 6,000 growers, who send about 200,000 tons of mangoes to the U.S. and Canada each year. 



Chiapas, which produces more Ataulfo mangoes than anywhere else in Mexico. 


Mexico provides 60 percent of the total mangoes eaten by U.S. consumers.

The Ataulfo variety comes to market early, around February or March. 



Its thin skin, creamy golden color and lack of fibers (the annoying ones that get stuck in your teeth) have made it a popular choice in many upscale U.S. supermarkets.







The region had a big cotton boom a few years ago, and growers used too many pesticides and fertilizers that eventually depleted the soil and killed off many of the insect pollinators.



A 2008 study by agricultural researchers at the U.S. Agency for International Development backed up that assessment, finding that mango production per hectare in the Soconusco region had dropped from about 15 tons in 1995 to two or three tons in 2008.
























MEXICO TO BEGIN SHIPPING TO USA FROM CHIAPAS NEXT WEEK ...





By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Vista, California






www.mangoworldmagazine.blogspot.com












January 26, 2012












IMO sources are reporting that Mexico will begin shipments of ataulfo mango from Chiapas as early as next week to the USA market.






Volume is expected to be higher than last year.


Chiapas has already begun harvesting and exporting by air to the European market.


According to EMEX data from last year, Chiapas exported 4,884,197 (4kg) cartons or 9.15% of mexico's total.


Over 98% of Chiapas volume is Ataulfo variety.


70% of Chiapas' Ataulfo mangoes were size 14,16 and 18 count.


Here is a report by USDA on volume out of Mexico from last season on a weekly basis.....








U.S. Import Volume
Per Week


Weekly report for date range: January 1, 2011 through May 31, 2011



Commodity NameOrigin NameWeek EndingPoundsBoxes of 8.8 lbs
MANGOSMEXICO01/08/20114,998568
MANGOSMEXICO01/15/201124,8142,820
MANGOSMEXICO01/22/201129,6133,365
MANGOSMEXICO01/29/2011155,44217,664
MANGOSMEXICO02/05/2011693,94978,858
MANGOSMEXICO02/12/20113,047,376346,293
MANGOSMEXICO02/19/20114,281,179486,498
MANGOSMEXICO02/26/20113,695,917419,991
MANGOSMEXICO03/05/20114,294,061487,961
MANGOSMEXICO03/12/20117,825,245889,232
MANGOSMEXICO03/19/201111,683,5701,327,678
MANGOSMEXICO03/26/201111,246,2941,277,988
MANGOSMEXICO04/02/201116,659,3181,893,104
MANGOSMEXICO04/09/201115,502,1971,761,613
MANGOSMEXICO04/16/201116,873,8381,917,482
MANGOSMEXICO04/23/201119,539,9052,220,444
MANGOSMEXICO04/30/201117,379,3261,974,923
MANGOSMEXICO05/07/201122,220,6462,525,073
MANGOSMEXICO05/14/201118,762,8792,132,145
MANGOSMEXICO05/21/201120,796,4822,363,237
MANGOSMEXICO05/28/201121,761,5612,472,905
MANGOSMEXICO06/04/201122,921,7622,604,746
Grand Total

239,400,37227,204,588

Source: USDA Market News - marketnews.usda.gov

SOUTH AFRICAN MANGOES FOR THE EUROPEAN MARKET WILL BE AVAILABLE IN LIMITED QUANTITIES ....







HIEDI MANGO BY AIR FROM SOUTH AFRICA ....










KEITT MANGO FROM SOUTH AFRICA ...



KEITT BY AIR FROM SOUTH AFRICA .....




KENT BY SEA FROM SOUTH AFRICA ....











HAPAG LLOYD TO OPEN OFFICES IN DUBAI ....








Hapag-Lloyd to Open Shipping Agency in Dubai





JOC Staff | Jan 26, 2012 3:04PM GMT


The Journal of Commerce Online - News Story






Joing venture with Inchcape Shipping Services will begin next month





Hapag-Lloyd will open its own shipping agency in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in a joint venture with its existing third party agent, Inchcape Shipping Services.



The new company, called Hapag-Lloyd Agency LLC, will start operating Feb. 1.




The German ocean carrier said ISS will continue to handle operations in Abu Dhabi.


Hapag-Lloyd is a major liner operator to and from the Indian Subcontinent and the Middle East, providing regular weekly connections to key trade lanes of Europe, the U.S. East Coast and the Far East.




http://www.joc.com/container-lines/hapag-lloyd-open-shipping-agency-dubai?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter







CINCINNATI AREA MANGO RETAIL REPORT FOR JANUARY 26TH 2012.....







Attila (Max) Komjathy




Cincinnati mango retail report, 01/26/2012





Wal-Mart store in Florence, KY, $ 1.18 a piece.



Kroger store at Union, KY – the price is 99 cents.


 Meijer store in Florence, KY, the price is 3/$5.





Remke store in Florence, KY, the price is 4/$5.







Attila (Max) Komjathy
akomjathy@marathonfruit.com 
            859-466-0220       cell


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Independence, KY 41051
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