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Showing posts from December 4, 2012

ECUADOR SET TO SHIP DOUBLE LAST YEAR'S VOLUME ...

By Will Cavan
Executive Director
International Mango Organization (IMO)
Publisher
Mango World Magazine (MWM) (IMO BLOG)






December 04, 2012






Winter Park, Florida






After years of moderate shipping volumes that have kept returns positive for Ecuadorian mango exporters, the current season is projected to nearly double last year's 6 million cartons.



Recent news reports are projecting 11 million cartons this year.






This increase in volume comes as a complete surprise to a battered marketplace that is rebuilding after the Daniella mango recall fiasco earlier this season.



This volume increase is projected to collide with Peruvian volume that is also estimated to ship nearly 25 million cartons this coming season. Approximately 40 to 50% of that volume will be shipped to the USA Market.






After a very well managed Brazilian season that saw FOB price per  (4kg) carton in the $9.00 range, prices have dropped down to the $6.00 range and is estimated to drop into the $4.00 range once Peru starts.











IRRADIATION WILL BOOST ACCESS TO USA MARKET FOR BETTER QUALITY MANGOES ...

Irradiation opens U.S. for Indian mangoes









December 4th, 2012



Post-harvest pest treatment by irradiation has helped re-open the United States market for Indian mangoes, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported.










Although India is the world’s largest mango producer, Indian mango exports to the U.S. were stopped in the mid-1980s due to pesticide residue concerns. Changes to regulatory pest protocols have only recently opened the market back up for the South Asian country.






Since 2007, certain specialty crops have had greater import access to the U.S. market, thanks to changes by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).





Irradiation was approved under the 2007 changes as a means to neutralize pests and meet U.S. regulatory requirements that would not normally be achievable.







Irradiation is considered the only post-harvest treatment without substantial and difficult-to-verify changes to production and handling systems. The treatment, however, is not the most economi…