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THE PACKER NEWSPAPER : Mangoes marketing business updates











04/04/2014 10:20:00 AM
Melissa Shipman











Amazon Produce Network improves quality control





 







Mullica Hill, N.J.-based Amazon Produce Network will continue to implement its new software system designed to improve quality control.




The system allows inspectors to take a photo of each pallet that comes into the warehouse. Each pallet is inspected for quality, condition, defects, and other important traits. Information is then reported back to the growers.








“We can have those reports immediately. The grower reaction has been really positive and our sales people have access to that data as well so it’s added value for the customers as well,”
said Greg Golden, partner and sales manager.






The company began using the system last year, but Golden said the process has been slowly improved and is really refined for this year.
























C.H. Robinson launches Happy Chameleon brand
















C.H. Robinson, Eden Prairie, Minn., launched its Happy Chameleon brand of tropical fruits last year. The line includes mangoes and other fruits such as limes and pineapples.



Drew Schwartzhoff, director of marketing and sourcing, said the brand is fun and colorful.




In addition, Jiovani Guevara, senior sourcing representative, was appointed to the National Mango Board by Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack.










 

Central American ProduceCentral American Produce introduces Capco label



Pompano Beach, Fla.-based Central American Produce launched a new branded mango for 2014.


The Capco mango label launched in January.


“We felt our mangoes needed a more vibrant presentation,” said marketing director Shannon Barthel.


So far, it has done well, according to Barthel.


“Reception of the new label has been outstanding, as it gives customers a beautiful display for the product,” she said.












GM Produce Sales celebrates 30 years

2014 marks the 30th anniversary for GM Produce Sales LLC, Hidalgo, Texas.

 

GM Produce Sales Inc.
Alyssa Martinez





Tom Shiba bought the business in 1984 and now Alyssa Martinez, hired this year, is the third generation of the family to join the company.



Martinez is a recent graduate of Texas A&M and will support the sales staff.



Last year marked a record year for GM. The company imported over 10 million boxes from Mexico, a number that has never before been achieved by any one importer, according to JoJo Shiba, marketing director.


This year, the company plans to increase its volume through its Nogales, Ariz., location.





“Nogales has given us more opportunities to better service our current and potential clients on the West Coast,”
said Wade Shiba, managing partner.








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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…