Skip to main content

Even WSJ agrees: GMOs threaten food security while offering no solution for India's poor



















Tuesday, July 22, 2014 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
Tags: GMOs, food security, Wall Street Journal











(NaturalNews) The government of India appears to be slowly falling into the clutches of multinational chemical companies craftily pushing their own patented genetically modified (GM) crops as the solution to hunger and poverty, with a new bill set to deliver subsidized food made from these poisons to more than 800 million Indian people. 




But one prominent organizer with extensive knowledge in Indian farming issues says the answer is not GM crops but rather agro-ecological approaches that rely on organic, chemical-free growing methods.





Dilnavaz Variava, who heads the consumer issues division of the Alliance for Sustainable and Holistic Agriculture, says more than 1 million Indian farmers from roughly 10,000 villages throughout the country are already growing pesticide-free crops on more than 3.5 million acres with great success -- apart from GMOs. 





This is the agriculture model with the greatest potential for feeding impoverished Indian people, she says, and the one that officials who are being courted by the biotech lobby are shamefully overlooking.





"India has enough food grain -- almost two-and-a-half times the required buffer stock -- and yet 200 million Indians go hungry,"
said Variava.





 "The problem of sufficiency is not one of production, but of economic and physical access.... Poverty, mounds of rotting food grain, wastage and leakages in the Public Distribution System are the real causes of food insecurity."







Food security has decreased in every country that adopted GMOsGetting India's overabundance of food to the people who need it, in other words, is the real issue -- not a lack of food. And introducing GMOs into the equation will do nothing to fix this distribution problem, instead creating food security issues that now plague every other country that has adopted GMOs.






"In the U.S., food insecurity has risen from 12% in pre-GM 1995 to 15% in 2011,"
stated Variava during a recent interview with The Wall Street Journal's (WSJ) India Real Time. 





"In Paraguay, where nearly 65% of land is under GM crops, hunger increased from 12.6% in 2004-06 to 25.5% in 2010-12."






"In Brazil and Argentina, GM food has not reduced hunger. In any event, GM does not increase yields, as the Union of Concerned Scientists established through a review of 12 years of GM in the U.S."







Agro-ecological farming is creating wealth, eliminating hunger in IndiaSince most Indian farms are small and run by families, the intensive inputs required for GMOs -- synthetic fertilizers, chemicals and royalties to biotech companies -- are both cost-prohibitive and unsustainable for India.





 On the other hand, agro-ecological farming, says Variava, is providing real wealth while boosting exports and creating lasting food security.





As she explained during her interview with the WSJ, organic farming methods that avoid GMOs are capable of increasing the per capita income of Indian farmers by 250 percent, leading to a wealth accumulation of $1.9 billion. The export market will also benefit, generating $87 million in exports and 2 million more employment opportunities over the course of five years.








"In India and most developing countries food is sold unpackaged," wrote one WSJ commenter who also attests to the successes of organic, agro-ecological farming as a viable food production and supply model in India. "Farms are small[,] and GM and non GM cannot be segregated -- as admitted by our Agriculture Department."






"The US Government and the US Trusts, which promote the interests of the GM seed patent corporates who use every trick in the book to promote GM in developing countries, under the guise of 'benevolence' to the 'poor' -- are doing a great disservice to US -India relations."






Popular posts from this blog

THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…

DHL (INDIA) makes gifting mangoes as easy as 1-2-3-....

Gifting mangoes is now easy with DHL
Announcement / Corporate


 May 19, 2011, 14:04 IST





Come this summer pamper your loved ones abroad with a box of delicious mangoes through DHL’s Express Easy Mango service, a unique one-stop-shop and hassle-free service for gifting mangoes all across the world.






This unique service by DHL Express, the world’s leading express company, allows customers to send mangoes from India across the world to the following countries Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Hong Kong, Italy, Luxemburg, Maldives, Netherlands, Norway, Oman, Qatar Singapore, Switzerland and Sweden.





Mangoes can be availed of free of cost by merely paying for the Air Express service. In addition, DHL Express assists customers with the necessary paperwork along with procurement of quality-grade Alphonso mangoes.





Commenting on the new service, Mr. R.S Subramanian, Country Head, DHL Express India said: “With the advent of the mango season, it is no wonder that DHL Express Ea…