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CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA ARE KEY TO CONTAINING EBOLA

















The real Ebola risk to the USA is from uncontrolled outbreaks in Central and South America, not direct flights from Africa




 


Friday, October 10, 2014
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger















(NaturalNews) Marine Corps Gen. John F. Kelly, the commander of the U.S. Southern Command, has just issued a public warning about the real Ebola threat to America. [1] That threat doesn't come via direct flights from Africa, Gen. Kelly insists, but rather from Ebola spreading in Central and South American nations, causing populations to flee northward, toward the U.S. southern border.







Gen. Kelly is absolutely correct. The real risk from Ebola must be understood with the recognition that there is zero border security separating the United States of America from Central and South American nations. This truism is obvious from the current state of ongoing illegal immigration which the federal government has stubbornly refused to halt. Right now, highly infectious carriers of any number of diseases are walking right across the southern border into Texas, Arizona, California and other states on a daily basis.





To stop Ebola in North America, it must be kept out of Central and South AmericaThe only way to stop Ebola from entering the United States, then, is to stop it from spreading in nations like Guatemala, El Salvador, Colombia and Brazil. The CDC has zero jurisdiction in those nations, and any honest assessment of the competence of these countries in handling pandemic outbreaks must reach a less-than-optimistic conclusion.


I have personally lived in Ecuador and traveled extensively throughout South America. While the people of these nations are wonderful, open-hearted individuals, their governments are striking examples of systemic incompetence. To imagine that any government in Central or South America can contain Ebola -- other than perhaps Costa Rica and Chile, both of which are substantially more forward-thinking -- is to live in a delusional fairytale land of lollipops and magical fairies.





Many of these Central and South American countries are wholly unable to control their own borders and have near-zero resources to attempt to halt infectious disease outbreaks. They're short on both hospitals and medical personnel, and medical training for dealing with level-4 biohazards is virtually non-existent.





Public sanitation standards are far lower south of the border




Throughout many Central and South American countries, public sanitation is shockingly poor. There are relatively few safety standards in place at restaurants and food production factories, and worrisome practices such as open-air meat markets are commonplace. Health and hygiene standards tend to be somewhat better in the cities, but they border on disastrous in many rural areas.



Even more concerning is the fact that burial practices throughout these regions closely mimic those of West Africa, where many Ebola infections have been acquired frominfectious dead bodies being carried and buried.



The disposal of dead bodies, in fact, may be the primary transmission vector happening right now in Africa. That these practices are so closely mirrored in many Central and South American countries is a serious concern indicating very high potential risk of an uncontrolled outbreak if Ebola is introduced to the region.



In short, what I'm saying here is that if Ebola spreads in Central and South America, it might never be eradicated there and could haunt the Americas for generations to come.



What is keeping Ebola out of Central and South American so far? Sheer luck...A tragically sobering infographic published at the Washington Post needs to be reviewed and understood by everyone. Click here to view it now.




Here's a thumbnail version of that infographic:












What this infographic shows is that the mathematics of Ebola's spread are vastly out-pacing the medical response. 





In order to halt the explosion of Ebola, 70% of infected people must be placed in treatment centers, but currently only 18% are.





In just one month, between 45,000 to 50,000 people are projected to be infected, yet even the massive effort of U.S. soldiers to build medical facilities will only provide treatment for 1,700 people.





In two months, the infographic shows, over 100,000 people are projected to be infected, far outpacing any possible response effort. From there, it just keeps growing exponentially.






This graphic, in summary, should probably be entitled, "Ebola: We're Screwed."






Sources for this article include:





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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…