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More markets for massive Australian mango crop

24 Nov, 2014 12

:24 PM

"I’m proud to be today unveiling the Strategic Export Plan for the Australian Mango Industry"


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MINISTER for Agriculture Barnaby Joyce and Northern Territory Minister for Primary Industries and Fisheries Willem Westra van Holthe visited a mango farm near Katherine, Northern Territory, last week, to speak to mango growers about new trade opportunities and to unveil the Strategic Export Plan for the Australian Mango Industry.

The ministers travelled to Pinata Farms’ most remote Honey Gold orchard.

“The Australian mango industry is booming. In 2012-13, Australian mango growers produced fruit valued at more than $93 million,”
Mr Joyce said.

“We’ve come a long way since the 1800s when the first mango plant found its way to Australia from its home country of India.

“But we’re always looking to expand and bring home better returns to the farmgate. That’s why I’m proud to be today unveiling the Strategic Export Plan for the Australian Mango Industry to expand our trade to more international markets and to grow the markets we do have.

“Last financial year we exported 212 tonnes of mangoes to Korea, Japan and China, with tariff reductions taking effect under recently agreed trade deals, these important markets are more appealing,”
Mr Joyce said.

“Australian mango growers produced more than 40,000 tonnes of fruit in 2012-13 and exported 4842 tonnes of that to mango lovers all over the world.”

Mr Westra van Holthe said further development of the international mango trade was important for realising the industry’s potential.

“Developing foreign markets is a major focus for this government and it is pleasing to see the industry has a target of doubling exports over the next three years. I applaud the industry for taking the lead and planning for their future,”
he said.

“So far this season the Territory has produced an estimated at 2.82 million trays of mangoes which is about 19,700 tonnes. This includes 2 million trays from Darwin and 800,000 trays from the Katherine and Mataranka area. It is anticipated another 800,000 trays will be picked in the Territory this season, over the next three weeks.

“By opening up trade to new foreign markets the Territory hopes to increase these figures.”

New export plan

The Department of Agriculture is working closely with the Australian Mango Industry Association (AMIA) to prepare growers and packers for registration to export to the US.

“I look forward to working closely with the mango industry to focus on their market access ambitions by incorporating a strong evidence-based approach to identify market access opportunities so we can direct our efforts to the most profitable markets,”
Mr Joyce said.

“This government promised greater market access for our agricultural producers and we’ve made a good start – but our work isn’t over.

“Now we have to make sure industry is ready to capitalise on current and future market opportunities.”

Department of Agriculture


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While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???

In alphabetical order by Country....



Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 

It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST

Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.

However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.

Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.

Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 

The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 

After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.

An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 

The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…