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Saudi Arabia Unveils Badass Anti-ISIS Wall That Makes U.S. Border Look Like Swiss Cheese





















BY JENNIFER VAN LAAR (2 HOURS AGO) | 









Getty - YASSER AL-ZAYYAT











The oldest way to defend land is through a physical barrier, such as a wall. Yet some Americans dispute the efficacy of a wall when defending our southern border against infiltration from either illegal immigrants or terrorists.






One country is not buying into that notion: Saudi Arabia.





Last week, a Saudi general was killed in a skirmish with ISIS at the border with Iraq, along which Saudi Arabia is constructing a 600-mile-long wall:







Image Credit: UPI









The prospect of this wall separating Iraq from Saudi Arabia is not a welcome one for ISIS, whose goals include capturing Saudi Arabia – home to the Holy Mosques of Mecca and Medina.



Saudi Arabia’s oil fields are another key strategic goal for the terror group intent on creating a Sharia-run caliphate.




Construction began on the wall last September and, according to Jane’s,



“…consists of 78 monitoring towers, eight command centers, 10 mobile surveillance vehicles, 32 rapid-response centers, and three rapid intervention squads, all linked by a fiber-optic communications network.”




The Kingdom is also creating a 1,000 mile wall along its border with Yemen to the south.




If the Saudis are putting this much stock in a wall, why do some in the United States claim that tactic won’t work here?





For one thing, the Mexican-U.S. border wall being constructed is more of a fence and not a fully integrated security solution.





Also, the Saudi’s wall is solely constructed in a desert, while the United States boundary includes a river. Wildlife concerns make it difficult to place a fortified border wall next to a body of water.





But, with the economic and public health threat posed by illegal border crossings and potential terrorism concerns, some feel that Congress might do well to take a cue from the Saudi solution–especially with the reported weaknesses with our own border security.







Unfortunately, within the fortress they are building, Saudi Arabia is still denying its citizens the most basic human rights. According to Yahoo News, the kingdom has ‘sparked an international outcry’ for sentencing a blogger to 1,000 lashings for insulting Islam.







http://www.ijreview.com/2015/01/233628-saudi-arabia-anti-isis-wall/




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In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



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Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…