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11 examples of China making large-scale knock-offs of world-famous buildings














ELENA HOLODNY


Jul. 7, 2015, 4:15 PM




Reuters/Paul YeungChinese workers in front of a replica colosseum, built during the reign of the Roman emperors Vespasian and Titus.








China's construction boom has been one of the biggest drivers of economic growth in the past few years.




And although most of that has been original infrastructure, China also focused its attention on building replicas of world-famous tourist destinations.









Many of the original "world wonders" are considered cultural status symbols that reflected an empire's soft power. Consequently, some analysts believe that it's about more than just pretty tourist spots for China.



"The ancient parallels for these copycat projects suggest that they are not mere follies, but monumental assertions of China’s global primacy," Oxford University scholar and archaeologist Jack Carlson wrote a few years back.







A nearly full-scale copy of the Great Sphinx of Giza, which was built by the ancient Egyptians of the Old Kingdom circa 2500 BC, is now standing at an unfinished theme park in Chuzhou, Anhui province in China.



Reuters/China Daily

Source: Sacred Destinations











In the Beijing World Park, there are replicas of the Washington DC's White House and Lincoln Memorial, as well as New York's Statue of Liberty.




Reuters/Claro Cortes IV

Source: China Guide













Other fun things you can find in the Beijing World Park include the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge. In total, there are over 100 world famous attractions in the park.



Reuters/David Gray









In Shanghai, you can find a copy of Italy's Leaning Tower of Pisa, which was originally designed by Bonanno Pisano, and eventually completed during the Italian Renaissance.



Reuters/China Photos












In China's southern city of Huizhou, in Guangdong province, there's a copy of Austria's UNESCO heritage site, Hallstatt. China Minmetals Corporation spent nearly $1 billion building this "controversial" site, according to Reuters.



Reuters/Tyrone Siu






One development company started building a fake Paris back in 2007 in Hangzhou, in the Zhejiang Province, complete with a scaled Eiffel Tower. Although it was designed for 10,000 people, the development is "sparsely populated, and is now considered a 'ghost town,'" according to Reuters.



Reuters/Aly Song







In the Wuqing district, you can find "Florentia Village," which is a 200,000 square meter shopping center designed with Florentine arcades, a grand canal, and bridges. It's built on top of a former corn-field, according to Reuters.


Reuters/David Gray







In Beijing's Mentougou district, one government building that houses several departments, including the Mentougou Weather Bureau, looks similar to Moscow's Kremlin.


Reuters/Stringer










Beijing has copies of the Moai statues. The 887 originals are found on the remote Chilean island, Easter Island, and were probably constructed somewhere between 1250 and 1500 CE.




Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon









In China's Jiangyan, Jiangsu province, you can find a mini, 10-foot version of Paris' Arc de Triomphe, which was originally built in the 19th century to commemorate those who fought in the Napoleonic Wars.



Reuters/Stringer

Source: Arc de Triomphe










And, somewhat fittingly, China's Macau — a gambling hotspot — houses a replica of Rome's Colosseum.





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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…