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2015 - 2016 MANGO SEASON : A huge El Niño could devastate Southern California


















“This definitely has the potential of being the Godzilla El Niño,”
said Bill Patzert, a climatologist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.













Waves crash into homes along Broad Beach in Malibu . (Ken Lubas / Los Angeles Times)





By RONG-GONG LIN II AND ABBY SEWELL




contact the reporters
Floods and Flooding
Avalanches and Landslides
Droughts and Heat Waves
Weather
National Weather Service
















It started in October 1997 in Mexico, when a hurricane fueled by El Niño slammed into Acapulco, causing massive flooding and hundreds of deaths. 





A few weeks later, storms started hitting Southern California. Mobile home parks in Huntington Beach flooded, forcing rescuers to use inflatable boats and a catamaran to rescue residents. 




Then in December, the skies opened up in Orange County in what meteorologists described as the biggest rainstorm in a century. 



More than seven inches fell in parts of south Orange County in one day. Mudslides destroyed hillside homes. Neighborhoods flooded. Major roads were made impassable by debris.



CAPTION
El Niño 1997-98
Alan Hagman / Los Angeles Times


Marilyn Lane tries to shut a door as a wave rushes into her Solimar Beach home during a January 1998 storm.









And that was just the beginning. Over the next few months, a series of powerful storms caused havoc, washing away roads and railroad tracks, overflowing flood control channels, causing 17 deaths and more than half a billion dollars in damage in California. The toll was far worse in Mexico, where Tijuana and other cities faced crippling flooding.







The importance of the El Niño storm of 1997-98 is now coming into focus as scientists say the weather pattern is returning to Southern California with a vengeance.




The strengthening El Niño in the Pacific Ocean has the potential to become one of the most powerful on record, as warming ocean waters surge toward the Americas, setting up a pattern that could bring once-in-a-generation storms this winter to drought-parched California.




The National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center said Thursday that all computer models are now predicting a strong El Niño to peak in the late fall or early winter. 




A host of observations have led scientists to conclude that “collectively, these atmospheric and oceanic features reflect a significant and strengthening El Niño.”













“This definitely has the potential of being the Godzilla El Niño,” said Bill Patzert, a climatologist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.




The forecast is expected to heighten planning for potential flooding this winter.




Los Angeles County flood control officials are beginning to plan for the worst.



Officials say they'll have tens of thousands of catch basins cleaned out to hold mud, rocks and other debris that might spill out from saturated hillsides.




During the last El Niño, some residents living in flood-prone areas attempted to boost their flood insurance before the storms came.







The 1997-98 storms exposed weaknesses in the region's flood control systems, some of what officials have been trying to address in the last two decades.




Patzert said El Niño’s signal in the ocean “right now is stronger than it was in 1997,” the summer in which the most powerful El Niño on record developed.



“Everything now is going to the right way for El Niño,”  Patzert said. 



“If this lives up to its potential, this thing can bring a lot of floods, mudslides and mayhem.”





Previous storms have shown vulnerability in the region's flood control system. 




In 1980, rains caused the lower end of the L.A. River -- roughly from Vernon to Long Beach -- to reach its flood control capacity. 



The Army Corps of Engineers discovered that some of the most vulnerable portions of the river were protected only against much smaller storm and flood events -- the kind that could strike the region every 25 years.





The levees were raised by as much as 8 feet and the level of protection was increased so that the river could withstand the kind of flooding that could occur every 133 years. Construction of culverts was among the improvements that followed flooding in 1992.




More recently, improvements were made in Orange County and the Inland Empire by widening Santa Ana River channels and raising the Prado Dam.




Times Staff Writer Shelby Grad contributed to this report.







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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…