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THE FUTURE OF COLOMBIA & VENEZUELA IS JOINED AT THE HIP

















The Devil's Excrement

Observations focused on the problems of an underdeveloped country, Venezuela, with some serendipity about the world (orchids, techs, science, investments, politics) at large.


 A famous Venezuelan, Juan Pablo Perez Alfonzo, referred to oil as the devil's excrement. 



For countries, easy wealth appears indeed to be the sure path to failure. Venezuela might be a clear example of that.





THE DEVIL’S EXCREMENT
Venezuela And Colombia: A Joint Future




ALL BLOGS BY MIGUEL OCTAVIO

El Excremento del Diablo

August 17, 2015












I was in Colombia last week. As the price of oil hit its lower level in five years, the Colombian peso was reaching a five-year bottom, Bogota’s real estate prices were dropping, the economy was slowing, but most people in Bogota seemed to be thinking, real state can not get lower than this and the price for the US$ is simply speculation, so why should I pay more for it?




Few seemed to see what I saw, that the peso will keep devaluing as oil drops and that the twenty-year boom in real estate prices is over. But sometimes changes are hard to see if you are a local.





Which made me think about the impact of what is going on in both Venezuela and Colombia in the future. And it is simply very bleak…





Think about it, at a time that Colombia is having a hard time with its finances and the dollar devaluing, more than one million Colombian/Venezuelans or Venezuelan/Colombians are thinking of going back to Colombia, as jobs are ever more scarce in that country. 



And the Santos administration is not even looking at the problem: 


** What are these people going to do? 

** Where will they work? 


** Who will employ them?





Because Colombians are more concerned with other problems, like increasing taxes to cover the deficit, or the FARC negotiations. Meanwhile, the economy seems to be running away from them.





But, without being a doomsday predictor, imagine some likely scenarios: Oil keeps dropping, the deficit keeps widening in Colombia, which only exacerbates the problem. What happens at $ 30 per barrel, how about $20, and don’t even think about $10.






But that is precisely the scenario we should be thinking about. 




At US$ 30 per barrel, which technically seems to be quite feasible, things would get so bad in Venezuela, which not only it would drive many Colombians out of Venezuela, but may force the Government of Venezuela, current or future, to equilibrate prices.



 And in such an equilibrium, not only will there be another million of Colombians be driven out of Venezuela, but there will be the destruction of thousands of jobs for Colombians, currently involved in the arbitrage of prices between the two countries.





To begin, the elimination or reduction of the arbitrage will be a severe blow to the Colombian economy.





 Not only will 25% of the oil sold in Colombia (local estimates of what is extracted from Venezuela) go back up to international prices, but thousands of items from food to medicines, to everyday items will no longer be available at much lower prices. 




And even worse, those currently employed in Colombia in the bachaquero/arbitrage industries, will lose their jobs. 




Just like that…



And we are talking of thousands of jobs, as evidenced by a friend of mine who went to the Guajira region and found that after a certain point, “formal” gas stations disappear, as “bachaqueros” take over from them, selling gasoline in containers and sophisticated pumping systems at a 30%-40% discount to Colombian prices.




Which implies that the humanitarian crisis will not be exclusive to Venezuela, but a joint problem.


 A problem that makes Venezuela’s future closely linked to Colombia’s. 





We face a joint future, which politician’s seem to be ignoring. But if oil truly goes down to the low 30’s as many expect it will, it is a joint future for the two countries.




And is not a pretty one.









http://devilexcrement.com/2015/08/17/venezuela-and-colombia-a-joint-future/







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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

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The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




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The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…