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COP21: Nicaragua refuses to make climate pledge at Paris talks















http://www.ft.com/cms/s/2/10b3910e-99ee-11e5-9228-87e603d47bdc.html#ixzz3u1DGQyjJ




Pilita Clark in Paris







©Reuters











It has been a while since the 6m people of Nicaragua did much to attract global attention.












But the Central American state burst on to the world stage at this week’s climate change conference in Paris when it became the first nation to declare it had no intention of publishing a national plan to combat global warming.





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That would be “a path to failure” said Paul Oquist, Managua’s lead negotiator, explaining his country did not want to be a part of a process dooming the world to “the hell” of dangerous global warming.




More than 180 of the 195 countries involved in the Paris talks have volunteered a plan to combat climate change since March as part of an effort to forge a new global accord to stop global temperatures rising more than 2C from pre-industrial times.




Their number includes the strife-torn Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, which was struggling this year with Ebola, and most of the world’s poorest countries, from Malawi and Burundi to Haiti and Niger.




But Mr Oquist, who first revealed his country’s stance to the Climate Home online news site, told reporters the voluntary nature of the pledges meant global temperatures were bound to rise.


“We do not want to be accomplices to the death, damages and destruction that a 3C or 4C world will represent,” he said.





Managua’s snub to the Paris conference, known as COP21, is unlikely to interrupt the meeting’s central aim of striking the first new UN climate agreement in 18 years. Nicaragua accounts for just 0.03 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions.








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But it sparked a terse response from some conference goers, including Monica Araya of Costa Rica, which shares a border with Nicaragua and is a pioneer of green policies such as a carbon tax.




“This is the wrong COP to seek attention without putting solutions on the table,”
said Ms. Araya, a former Costa Rican negotiator. “Paris cannot be kidnapped by a few countries playing ideological games.”




Nicaragua’s stance was disconnected from what developing countries are doing in practice, she said, adding her country’s climate plans included electric trains and other measures that would deliver tangible benefits to people and companies.




As of Sunday, Nicaragua was one of nine countries yet to submit a climate pledge.







The others were: oil-rich Venezuela, North Korea, Libya, East Timor, Nepal, Uzbekistan, St Kitts and Nevis and Panama.






Panama delegate, Rosilena Lindo, said her country had been working hard on its climate strategy, which includes plans to boost its solar and wind power, and would publish it as soon as it had finished a round of consultations.




“It’s a big decision and we have to be very sure that all the population is committed to it and accepts what we are proposing,” she told the FT.


















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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





In alphabetical order by Country....










India




Alphonso





Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia








Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

INDIA 2016 : Mango production in state likely to take a hit this year

TNN | May 22, 2016, 12.32 PM IST






Mangaluru: Vagaries of nature is expected to take a toll on the production of King of Fruits - Mango - in Karnataka this year. A combination of failure of pre-monsoon showers at the flowering and growth stage and spike in temperature in mango growing belt of the state is expected to limit the total production of mango to an estimated 12 lakh tonnes in the current season as against 14 lakh tonnes in the last calendar year.



However, the good news for fruit lovers is that this could see price of mangoes across varieties decrease marginally by 2-3%. This is mainly on account of 'import' of the fruit from other mango-growing states in India, said M Kamalakshi Rajanna, chairperson, Karnataka State Mango Development and Marketing Corporation Ltd.




Karnataka is the third largest mango-growing state in India after Uttar Pradesh and Maharashtra.



Inaugurating a two-day Vasanthotsava organized by Shivarama Karantha Pilikula Nisargadhama and the Corporation at P…

Mangoes date back 65 million years according to research ...

Experts at the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany (BSIP) here have traced the origin of mango to the hills of Meghalaya, India from a 65 million year-old fossil of a mango leaf. 





The earlier fossil records of mango (Mangifera indica) from the Northeast and elsewhere were 25 to 30 million years old. The 'carbonized leaf fossil' from Damalgiri area of Meghalaya hills, believed to be a mango tree from the peninsular India, was found by Dr R. C. Mehrotra, senior scientist, BSIP and his colleagues. 




After careful analysis of the fossil of the mango leaf and leaves of modern plants, the BISP scientist found many of the fossil leaf characters to be similar to mangifera.


An extensive study of the anatomy and morphology of several modern-day species of the genus mangifera with the fossil samples had reinforced the concept that its centre of origin is Northeast India, from where it spread into neighbouring areas, says Dr. Mehrotra. 




The genus is believed to have disseminated into neighb…