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Showing posts from September 19, 2015

RAIN IS ON ITS WAY FOR NORTHERN BAJA CALIFORNIA

In May, San Diego got 2.39 inches of rain. It was the second most ever recorded in town during the month. That was weird.





In July, remnants of Hurricane Dolores delivered 1.71 inches to San Diego, the most ever in July. That was very weird.




On Tuesday, Hurricane Linda leftovers, pulled up by a trough that dropped down from the north, dumped 1.24 inches at Lindbergh. Very odd. 



But we may be about to encounter the strangest weather we've had all year. The National Weather Service says that this coming week, the precipitable water level, a measure of the moisture in the atmosphere that could fall as rain, could be the highest on record for Southern California in the month of September. 



The so-called PW this coming week could surpass the 2.15 inches measured in September 1997, when remnants of former Hurricane Nora drenched the region, and San Diego got 0.76 of an inch. The weather service now projects 0.88 of an inch at Lindbergh Field this week. Mount Laguna stands to get more than 2.…

A TRIBUTE TO MY FATHER : THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND MY ENDEAVOURS

Recognized for valor in Vietnam









Completing a marathon in San Diego at 56 years old









With my Father

















Always with us every step of every day....





















With the Love of His life








56 years of Marriage








The Global Trade Organizations












IN HONOR OF MY FATHER : THE FLIGHT OF THE ECUADOR II (The Spirit of Goodwill)

Family will keep flight legacy alive with another journey to Ecuador











By Melonyce McAfee
June 4, 2005






EL CAJON – Theodore Gildred Sr., emboldened by Charles Lindbergh's solo flight from New York to Paris in 1927, yearned to make his mark in aviation.





The San Diego businessman owned a Stinson airplane dealership and had lived and worked in South America for years, and in 1931, he flew to Ecuador on a journey themed "Spirit of Goodwill."






FRED GREAVES
Ted Gildred Jr. spoke during a dedication ceremony at Gillespie Field yesterday, announcing that he would again re-create his father's 1931 flight to Ecuador.









Since then, his son, Ted Gildred Jr., has followed his dad's flight path.


Twenty-four years ago, the son flew 4,200 miles to Ecuador to commemorate the 50th anniversary of his father's trip.
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