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JAPAN : In chilly Hokkaido, farmer uses hot spring to grow premier mangoes











Mango farmer Mitsumune Murata shows off produce that his friends doubted he could grow. | KYODO







BY YUYA NODA

KYODO







JAN 21, 2016










KUSHIRO, HOKKAIDO – In the cold, snowy town of Teshikaga, Hokkaido, Mitsumune Murata was contemplating how to make use of a plot of land with a hot spring when he came up with a unique idea: mangoes.




Murata is a big fan of onsen (spas), but did not feel like constructing a hot springs facility as there already were many in the neighborhood’s Mashu Onsen area. So he decided to use that thermal energy to heat greenhouses instead.






Perhaps because the tropical fruit was too far removed from the common image of wintry Hokkaido, friends he consulted were all skeptical of his plan and said the business would not work. The negative responses just made him more determined to give it a try.




“Since everyone is saying this is (unfeasible), I thought it would be rather interesting if I actually succeed in making it happen,” the 63-year-old president of Farm People, a local agricultural production corporation, recalled.




Heat from hot water running through underground pipes keeps the greenhouses at around 25 degrees during the day. Even at night when the outside temperature drops to minus 25, it remains a toasty 20 degrees inside. And thanks to the spa water, costs are much lower than using fuel-fed heaters, Murata said.







After establishing his company in September 2011, Murata consulted experienced mango farmers from Miyazaki and Kagoshima prefectures, two of Japan’s main producers of the fruit. Two years later, in 2013, the farm harvested its first batch of mangoes under the brand name Gokkan Kanjuku Mango — Mashuko no Yuhi (roughly translated as Fully Ripened Mango from the Severe Cold — Sunset at Lake Mashu).



The fruit has bright, dense orange flesh, and a fair sugar content.



In Japan, mangoes are usually harvested from spring through summer, with growers in the southwestern prefectures of Miyazaki, Kagoshima and Okinawa producing 95 percent of the domestic crop, the agriculture ministry said.




But Murata’s mangoes hit the market between November and March, making them a novel and popular purchase during the traditional oseibo gift-giving season in December.




The farm expects to ship about 20,000 mangoes this season. “We aim to increase the shipment to 80,000 in three years,” Murata said.






Murata also shared a little secret — he had actually never eaten a mango before he conceived the idea of growing the fruit himself. Now, all he tastes is sweet success.







http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/01/21/national/chilly-hokkaido-farmer-uses-hot-spring-grow-mangoes/#.VqGW3fkrKVN




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THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER MANGOES IN THE WORLD ....

While "Flavor" is very subjective, and each country that grows mangoes is very nationalistic, these are the mango varieties that are the most sought after around the world because of sweetnesss (Brix) and demand.

The Chaunsa has a Brix rating in the 22 degree level which is unheard of!
Carabao claims to be the sweetest mango in the world and was able to register this in the Guiness book of world records.
Perhaps it is time for a GLOBAL taste test ???





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India




Alphonso




Alphonso (mango)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia







Alphonso (हापुस Haapoos in Marathi, હાફુસ in Gujarati, ಆಪೂಸ್ Aapoos in Kannada) is a mango cultivar that is considered by many[who?] to be one of the best in terms of sweetness, richness and flavor. 


It has considerable shelf life of a week after it is ripe making it exportable. 

It is also one of the most expensive kinds of mango and is grown mainly in Kokan region of western India.

 It is in season April through May and the fruit wei…

7 Medicinal Properties Of Mango Leaves That You Aren’t Aware Of!

By admin

• On December 11, 2016 • 



Many of us know how delicious mangoes are!




Basically, mangoes are very nutritious and healthy to eat regularly, where not only just kids but also adults love to eat. These mangoes are only found in the large areas of India and it is said to be the hub of mangoes where huge quantities of mangoes are exported from this country to all the countries.


When we look into mango leaves­ they’re basically like the all other leaves i.e. green in color.
 At first they’re reddish in color and as they grow­ they turn into dark greenish color.

Mango leaves are rich in:
Vitamin A
Vitamin B
Vitamin C
Also rich in flavonoids and phenols
Have powerful antioxidant properties



These were just the qualities of these leaves­ now we’ll understand about the importance of these leaves and the medical impact on the human body.


1. Diabetes


These leaves are rich in tannins called anthocyanidins­ useful for treating diabetes in the early stage.
The method of using these leaves is simple­ first w…