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Showing posts from May 11, 2018

PAKISTAN MANGO SEASON IN JEOPARDY

RBRafiq BashirMWater scarcity in Sindh may damage mango cropListenKARACHI: Water scarcity is Sindh is most likely to damage mango crop yield worth billions of rupee.Fruit farmers and agriculturists say at least 60 per cent of mango crop has been damaged in the province. Due to lack of irrigation this year, mango tree branches are too weak to bear the weight of the growing fruit.
https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/314633-water-scarcity-in-sindh-may-damage-mango-crop



CAMBODIA SEEKS TO COMPLY WITH INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS

https://www.khmertimeskh.com/50487613/keo-romeat-mango-to-get-standard/
The government will issue a standard for the type of mango known as ‘keo romeat’, a move that seeks to bolster sales abroad as well as consumer trust on the product, a high-ranking official revealed yesterday.Chan Sopha, deputy director general at the Institute of Standards of Cambodia, told Khmer Times that they are cooperating with farmers and other relevant stakeholders in the industry to establish the new standard, which entails collecting information on everything from size and colour to common diseases and pollutants.

THINK OF INDIA THE NEXT TIME YOU EAT A KEITT MANGO

http://mangoworldmagazine.blogspot.com/2012/05/mystery-behind-first-mango-trees-gifted.html?m=1
History. 'Keitt' was reportedly a seedling of the Mulgoba cultivar that was planted on the property of Mrs. J.N. Keitt in Homestead, Florida in 1939. ... The cultivar was selected and named in 1945, after which it quickly gained commercial nursery acceptance for its flavor, productivity and lack of fiber.


Today there are over 300 acres of KEITT mangoes planted in the Coachella Valley in Southern California thanks to the vision of Howard Marguleaus and the input of 3 Flags Ranch and the funding of the Mormon Church Agricultural arm.

HISTORICAL DISTRIBUTION OF MANGO FROM INDIA AROUND THE WORLD

From the USDA archives we have come across a book authored by among others, Dr. Pompenoe founder of The Zamorano Agricultural school in Honduras.The book was published in 1921 THE BOOK OF THE MANGOBY W. BURNS, D.Sc. (Edin.) Economic Botanist to the Government of Bombay
AND
S. H. PRAYAG, M.Ag. (Bom.) Department of Agriculture, BombayBOMBAY Printed at the Government Central Press 1921The book makes limited reference to the migration of Indian mango around the world:Somali land 1331.Mozambique, Egypt, Cairo and Livingstonia (last three recently).Madeira, Canaries (19th century), Azores, 1865. Hawaii (1865), Fiji Islands.Philippine Islands (after 1600), Moluccas (1665). Barbados, Jamaica, Santa Domingo, Cuba. Southern Italy (1905), Portugal (Ibe- rian Peninsula). England (Hampton Court in 1690) (fruited in Kew in 1808). New South WaIes, Queensland (about 50 years ago). (1) Wester, The Mango, p. 12. (2) From information supplied on the works of Wester, Watls, etc. Brazil (date unknown). R…

WHERE DO MANGOES GROW BEST

F. W. Popenoe^^' says : " Lower Bengal is noted as a hot humid tropical region where even the most delicate plants, such as, for instance the Amherstia, can be grown to perfection. To the mind of the average Northern horticulturist, it is in just such regions that the mango should thrive, but quite the contrary is the case, and it requires only one glance at any of the mango topes about Calcutta, to show that the trees are far from healthy, and not adapted to such a region. Their growth is scraggy, their foliage thin and of an unhealthy colour and the fruit does not ripen well. A sharp contrast to these conditions are the trees at Saharanpur which are vigorous and stocky, the foliage abundant and of that rich green colour which speaks volumes. It is this comparatively dry atmosphere coupled with the extreme heat that produces mangoes that have made Saharanpur famous. At the same time the relative humidity never goes as low as it does in some parts of the S.W. United States a…